This Week’s Birthdays (August 7 – 13)

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Connie Stevens

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Happy Birthday this week to:

August 07
1925 ● Felice Bryant / (Felice Scaduto Bryant) → Prolific country and pop songwriter, with her husband Boudleaux Bryant wrote “Rocky Top,” “Love Hurts,” “Bye Bye Love” (#2, 1957) and “All I Have To Do Is Dream” (#1, 1958) for The Everly Brothers, as well as “Raining In My Heart” for Buddy Holly, died on 4/22/2003, age 77
1926 ● Stan Freberg → Irreverent, visionary radio comic/satirist, combined music with spoken word to create novelty songs, including “The Banana Boat Song (Day-O)” (#25, 1957), animation voice actor, advertising creative director, author
1928 ● Herbert Reed → Founding member (1953) and bass vocals for hugely successful R&B/doo wop The Platters, “The Great Pretender” (#1, 1956) and 13 other Top 20 hits between 1955 and 1967, sang on every one of the group’s over 400 recorded songs, waged a successful court battle for rights to The Platters‘ name, died from heart disease on 6/4/2012, age 83
1931 ● Jack Good → Oxford-educated British actor turned 50s rock ‘n’ roll artist manager (Billy Fury, Cliff Richard and other U.K. hitmakers) and TV music program producer, first on the BBC musical variety show Six-Five Special, then as creator and producer of Oh Boy!, the U.K.’s first all rock ‘n’ roll teen music TV program, left the U.K. in 1962 for an unsuccessful attempt at Hollywood acting but resurfaced in 1964-1966 as creator and producer of Shindig! on ABC-TV in the U.S., in the 70s turned to theatrical musical productions and later moved to New Mexico to paint religious murals, died from complications of a fall at home in the U.K. on 9/24/2017, age 86
1936 ● Charles Pope → With brother Joseph and others, vocals for R&B/soul The Tams, “What Kind Of Fool (Do You Think I Am)” (#9, 1963) and “There Ain’t Nothing Like Shaggin'” (UK #21, 1987), continued to perform until a few years before his death from Alzheimer’s disease on 7/11/2013, age 76
1939 ● Ron Holden → One hit wonder R&B/pop singer (“Love You So,” #7, R&B #11, 1960), died of a heart attack on 1/22/1997, age 57
1941 ● Howard Johnson / (Howard Lewis Johnson) → Multi-instrumentalist jazz musician, primarily on tuba and baritone saxophone, who spent nearly 60 years elevating the role of the lowly tuba in jazz, rock and pop music, as a sideman with numerous jazz greats in the 60s, with Taj Mahal on The Real Thing (1971), with The Band on The Last Waltz (1978), as an original member of the Saturday Night Live house band, through various collaborations and TV performances, and as founder and frontman for tuba-based jazz fusion Gravity, which he formed in 1970 and led until just before dying at home following a long illness on 1/11/2021, age 79.
1942 ● B. J. Thomas / (Billy Joe Thomas) → Five-time Grammy-winning light pop-rock singer with the Grammy Hall of Fame “Raindrops Keep Fallin’ On My Head” (#1, 1970) plus “Hooked On A Feeling” (#5, 1968) and “(Hey Won’t You Play) Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song” (#1, 1975), turned to gospel and country music later in his career and scored hits with “New Looks From An Old Lover” (Country #1, 1983) and others, performed on the oldies circuit and in nightclubs, sang commercial jingles and issued twelve studio albums after 2000, announced in March 2021 that he was suffering from lung cancer and died from the disease on 5/29/2021, age 78.
1943 ● Lana Cantrell → Aussie-American pop and traditional standards singer turned entertainment lawyer, recorded seven albums along with a lone charting single (“Like A Sunday Morning,” #63, 1975) and appeared in Vegas and on TV musical variety shows before ditching her singing career for a law degree and practice in New York City in the 90s
1945 ● Kerry Chater → Bassist for 60s pop-rock Gary Puckett & The Union Gap, “Young Girl” (#2, 1968)
1949 ● Carlo Novi → Saxophones for New Jersey rock ‘n roll bar band Southside Johnny & The Asbury Jukes, “Talk To Me” (1978)
1950 ● Rodney Crowell → Neo-traditionalist country singer/songwriter and guitarist, “I Couldn’t Leave You If I Tried” (Country #1, 1988) and ten other Country Top 25 hits, worked in Emmylou Harris‘ backing band, artists who covered his songs include Bob Seger, “Shame On The Moon” (#2, 1982), Johnny Cash and Crystal Gayle
1951 ● Pete Way / (Peter Frederick Way) → British hard rock bass guitarist known for pushing the edge of rock excesses, especially for a bass player, co-founded proto-metal UFO in 1968 and registered eight US and five UK charting albums, including Mechanix (#80, UK #8), before departing in 1982, briefly played with hard rock Fastway and Ozzy Osbourne‘s touring band before founding hard rock Waysted later that year, rejoined UFO and stayed with the band until retiring in 2008 for health reasons, played in several hard rock projects in the 10s and wrote an autobiography in 2017, sustained life-threatening injuries in an accident of undisclosed causes and died two months later on 8/14/2020, age 69.
1952 ● Alexei David Sayle → Stand-up comedian and satire/novelty pop song artist, “Ullo John! Gotta New Motor” (UK #15, 1984), film actor (Gorky Park, 1983 and Indiana Jones And The Last Crusade, 1989), radio and TV personality, author
1958 ● Bruce Dickinson → Vocalist for Brit heavy metal Iron Maiden, “Flight Of Icarus” (Mainstream Rock #8, 1983), then solo, “Tears Of A Dragon” (Mainstream Rock #36, 1994), now flies as a B757 captain for UK charter airline Astraeus, BBC Radio host, author
1960 ● Jacqui O’Sullivan → Brit singer and songwriter, backing vocals for Status Quo, Visage and the Eurythmics, joined pop trio Bananarama in 1988, “I Want You Back” (UK #5, 1988), solo
1964 ● Ian Dench → Chief songwriter and guitarist for Brit dance-rock quintet EMF (“Epsom Mad Funkers”), “Unbelievable” (#1, 1990)
1965 ● Johnny Solinger / (John Preston Solinger) → Frontman for an 80s-90s eponymous Texas hard rock band, hired in 1999 as lead vocalist to replace founding member Sebastian Bach in New Jersey-based hair metal/pop-metal Skid Row (“I Remember You,” #6, 1989), recorded and performed as their longest-serving vocalist until fired in 2015, issued a solo country-metal album in 2008, died from liver failure on 6/26/2021, age 56.
1965 ● Raul Malo → Singer, songwriter, guitarist and frontman for Grammy-winning country-rock The Mavericks, “All You Ever Do Is Bring Me Down” (Country #13, 1996), solo
1966 ● Kristin Hersh → Singer/songwriter, lead vocals and guitar for alt rock Throwing Muses, “Dizzy” (Modern Rock #8, 1989) and alt punk rock power trio 50 Foot Wave, acoustic solo performances, author and co-founder of non-profit CASH Music recording software
1968 ● Lynn Strait / (James Lynn Strait) → Lead singer and songwriter for up-and-coming punk/nu-metal Snot, the band broke up shortly after his death in a California highway accident on 12/11/1998, age 30

August 08
1907 ● King Carter / (Bennett Lester Carter) → Lifetime Grammy Award and National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master alto saxophonist with a long and prolific career from the late 20s to the early-00s, his best known composition was the Grammy-winning “Prelude To A Kiss” (Best Jazz Instrumental, 1994), died from natural causes on 7/12/2003, age 95
1920 ● Jimmy Witherspoon → Late 40s jump blues “shouter” and rock ‘n’ roll roots singer, “Ain’t Nobody’s Business (Parts 1 & 2)” (R&B #1, 1949), his style went out in the late 50s and he switched to blues-rock, recorded occasionally through he 70s, toured and performed until just before he died of throat cancer on 9/18/1997, age 77
1921 ● Webb Pierce → One of the most popular 50s/60s honky tonk and rockabilly singer/songwriters with dozens of Country Top 20 hits and a handful of crossover hits, including “More And More” (#22, Country #1, 1954) and “I Ain’t’ Never” (#24, Country #2, 1959), lived a large and flamboyant lifestyle from the end of his recording days in the early 80s to his death from pancreatic cancer on 2/24/1991, age 69
1932 ● Mel Tillis / (Lonnie Melvin Tillis) → Prolific country music singer (despite a pronounced stutter) and songwriter with 34 songs in the Country Top 10 and the crossover hit “Ruby Don’t Take Your Love To Town” (#6, Country #39, 1970) for Kenny Rogers & The New Edition, others of his songs have been covered by Linda Ronstadt, Ricky Van Shelton, Waylon Jennings and others, later invested in radio stations, music publishing and a theater in Branson, Missouri, died from respiratory failure on 11/19/2017, age 85
1933 ● Joe Tex / (Joseph Arlington) → R&B/Southern soul singer, “Hold On To What You’ve Got” (#5, 1965) and eight other Top 40 hits, died of a heart attack on 8/13/1982, age 49
1938 ● Connie Stevens / (Concetta Rosalie Ann Ingoglia) → Pop music singer with six charting singles in 1959-65, including “Sixteen Reasons” (#3, 1960), then starred in the TV series Hawaiian Eye and in numerous films in the 60s, turned to various business and humanitarian projects in the 80s and 90s, and added film direction and screenwriting to her resume in the 90s and 00s
1938 ● Don Jacobucci → Baritone vocals for two hit wonder doo wop quartet The Regents, original “Barbara Ann” (#13, 1961) and “Run Around” (#28, 1961)
1939 ● Phil Balsley → Baritone vocals in country-gospel-pop crossover harmonic quartet The Statler Brothers (“Flowers On The Wall,” #4, Country #2, 1965), known as the “Quiet One” for his on stage presence and humble appearance
1939 ● Jerry Slick / (Gerald Slick) → Aspiring filmmaker, rock drummer, first husband of singer Grace Slick and co-founding member of San Francisco 60s acid rock The Great Society, the group recorded dozens of songs but released only one single, “Someone To Love” (1965) during their brief existence which ended in 1966 when Grace left to join Jefferson Airplane (and release the re-titled “Somebody To Love” (#5, 1967)), joined psych-rock The Final Solution for a brief stint before re-focusing on filmmaking, divorced Grace and won a Clio award in 1971 for an advertisement recruiting San Francisco police officers, died from undisclosed causes on 3/19/2020, age 80.
1942 ● Jay David / (John David) → Drummer for AM pop-rock Dr. Hook & The Medicine Show, “Sylvia’s Mother” (#5, 1972) plus nine other Top 40 hits
1944 ● Michael Johnson → Adult contemporary pop and country singer, songwriter and guitarist, “Bluer Than Blue” (#12, 1978) and two other Top 40 hits plus seven Country Top 40 singles
1944 ● John Renbourn → English singer, songwriter and guitarist with a nearly 5 decade solo career and over 30 albums, but best known for his collaboration with guitarist Bert Jansch and co-founding folk-rock group Pentangle (“Light Flight,” UK #43, 1970), continued to record tour until his death from a heart attack on 3/26/2015, age 70
1949 ● Airrion Love → Vocals for R&B/Philly soul The Stylistics, “You Make Me Feel Brand New” (#2, 1974) plus 15 R&B Top 40 singles
1949 ● Keith Carradine → Four-decade Broadway stage and Hollywood film actor with a short pop music career based on the Oscar-winning, self-penned “I’m Easy” (#17, AC #1, 1976) from the movie Nashville (1975)
1956 ● Ali Score / (Alister Score) → Drummer for bizarrely-teased hair New Wave pop-rock A Flock of Seagulls, “I Ran (So Far Away)” (#9, 1982)
1956 ● Chris Foreman → Guitar for punk/ska revival Madness, “Our House” (#7, 1982) and over 20 other UK Top 40 singles
1956 ● David Grant → Pop singer and member of Brit soul/funk Linx, “You’re Lying” (R&B #27, 1981) and “Intuition” (UK #7, 1981), then solo, “Watching You Watching Me” (UK #10, 1983), celebrity vocal coach and husband of Carrie Grant
1957 ● Dennis Drew → Keyboardist, co-founder and one of two constant members of folk-pop 10,000 Maniacs, “These Are Days” (Alt-Rock #1, 1992)
1961 ● Paul Jackson → Bassist for New Wave pop-rock T’Pau, “Heart And Soul” (#4, 1987)
1961 ● Rikki Rockett / (Richard Allen Ream) → Drummer for hair metal/power ballad Poison, “Every Rose Has It’s Thorn” (#1, 1988), solo and owner of a custom drum kit manufacturing company
1961 ● The Edge / (David Howell Evans) → Guitarist, occasional vocalist and sometime songwriter for Irish mega-star rockers U2, “With Or Without You” (#1, 1987)
1962 ● Kool Moe Dee / (Mohandas Dewese) → Member of early hip hop/old-school rap Treacherous Three, left for Grammy-winning solo career in 1986, “Rise ‘N’ Shine” (Rap #1, 1991)
1973 ● Scott Stapp / (Anthony Scott Flippen) → Founding member, lead vocalist and lyricist for Grammy-winning post-grunge Creed, “With Arms Wide Open” (#1, 2000), solo
1973 ● Toby Allen → With brothers Andrew and Mike Tierney and another schoolmate, co-founder and vocals in Motown-inspired Aussie teen-pop boyband Human Nature (“Everytime You Cry,” AUS #3, 1997), currently in residence on the Las Vegas Strip performing in a Motown-themed show
1974 ● Brian Harvey → Vocalist and rapper for Brit teen dance-pop/hip hop boy band East 17, “Stay Another Day” (UK #1, 1994), plus over 15 other UK Top 40 hits
1976 ● Drew Lachey → With brother Nick and two others, vocalist in adult contemporary pop-rock boy band 98 Degrees, “Give Me Just One Night (Una Noche)” (#2, 2000), TV and Broadway actor, celebrity dancer on Dancing With The Stars in 2006
1976 ● JC Chasez / (Joshua Scott Chasez) → Lead vocals for teen dance-pop harmony boy band ‘N Sync, “It’s Gonna Be Me” (#1, 2000), solo
1981 ● Bradley McIntosh → Vocals for pre-fab teen pop S Club 7, “Never Had A Dream Come True” (#10, 2001)
1983 ● Vanessa Joy Amorosi → Australian pop singer/songwriter and guitarist, “Absolutely Everybody” (UK #7, Australia #6, 1999) and “This Is Who I Am” (Australia #1, 2009)

August 09
1913 ● Harry Mills / (Harry Flood Mills) → Baritone vocals in six-decade jazz and pop quartet The Mills Brothers (“Cab Driver,” #23, Adult #3, 1968), best known for approximating instrument sounds with vocals, first as a novelty act in the vaudeville era of the 20s and later as the music behind their singing, continued to perform with his brothers until his death on 6/28/1982, age 68
1934 ● Merle Kilgore → Country-pop singer, songwriter and business manager best known for co-writing “Ring Of Fire” (Johnny Cash #17, Country #1, 1963) with June Carter Cash and “Wolverton Mountain (“#6, Country #1, 1962) for Claude King, for being Johnny Cash‘s best man at his wedding in 1968, for managing Hank Williams Jr., and for his involvement with the Country Music Association, died from heart failure on 2/6/2005, age 70
1939 ● Billy Henderson → Founding member and vocals for Grammy-winning Motown and later Atlantic R&B/soul quintet The Spinners, “Then Came You” (#1, 1974) plus eleven other Top 20 hits in the 70s, died from diabetes on 2/7/2007, age 67
1943 ● Wanda Young / (Wanda LaFaye Young Rogers) → Teenage vocalist recruited in 1961 by high school chum Gladys Horton to share lead vocals in fledlging Motown girl group The Marvelettes just before recording of their debut smash hit, “Please Mr. Postman” (#1, R&B #1, 1961), sang lead on later hits “Don’t Mess With Bill” (#7, R&B #3, 1966) and “The Hunter Gets Captured By The Game” (#13, R&B #2, 1967), after disbandment in 1970 recorded an unsuccessful solo project marketed as a Marvelettes album, rejoined Horton for a 1990 collaborative album of Marvelettes re-recordings but largely lived off royalities for decades, died from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on 12/15/2021, age 78.
1944 ● Viv Prince / (Vivian St. John Prince) → Drummer for raunchy R&B/blues-rock British Invasion band The Pretty Things, “Don’t Bring Me Down” (UK #10, 1964)
1946 ● Marinus Gerritsen → Bassist for Dutch hard rock Golden Earring, “Radar Love” (#13, 1974), over 40 hits and 30 gold and platinum albums in the Netherlands
1947 ● Amanda McBroom → Singer, songwriter, cabaret performer and TV and voice actress best known for writing “The Rose” (Bette Midler, #3, AC #1, 1979) from the soundtrack to the 1979 film of the same name, and for roles on Broadway shows and TV series including Hawaii Five-O and Charlie’s Angels
1947 ● Barbara Mason → R&B/soul-pop one hit wonder singer, “Yes, I’m Ready” (#5, 1965)
1948 ● Bill Collings / (William Ralph Collings) → Pre-med college drop out whose curiousity for guitars led him to become a luthier and founder of Collings Guitars, a leading mass-producer of stringed instruments, his guitars were used by Lyle Lovett, Pete Townshend, Emmylou Harris, Joni Mitchell, Paul Simon and many others, died from bile duct cancer on 7/14/2017, age 68
1955 ● Charlie Morgan → Session drummer and percussionist, played with Kate Bush, Elton John, Paul McCartney, Orleans, Tom Robinson Band, Tina Turner and others
1959 ● Kurtis Blow / (Kurtis Walker Combs) → First commercially-successful rapper, first hip hop artist to sign with a major record label and first to have a gold rap song, “The Breaks” (R&B #4, Dance/Club #9, 1980), producer and songwriter
1963 ● Whitney Houston → Immensely popular, Grammy and Emmy award winning R&B/pop singer with the biggest hit single in rock/pop history, “I Will Always Love You” (#1, 1993) plus nine other US #1s, cousin of soul-pop songstress Dionne Warwick and goddaughter of R&B/soul diva Aretha Franklin, drowned in a hotel bathtub on 2/12/2012, age 48
1970 ● Arion Salazar → Original bassist for post-grunge indie pop Third Eye Blind, “Semi-Charmed Life” (#4, 1997)
1978 ● Luke Concannon → Guitar and vocals for Brit folk-rock-hip hop one hit wonder duo Nizlopi, “JCB Song” (UK #1, 2005)

August 10
1909 ● Leo Fender / (Clarence Leonidas Fender) → Inventor of the Fender Broadcaster, Telecaster and Stratocaster guitars used by countless rock musicians, died of Parkinson’s disease on 3/21/1991, age 81
1922 ● Al Alberts / (Al Albertini) → Co-founding member and vocals in traditional pop quartet The Four Aces, “Love Is A Many-splendored Thing” (#1, 1955) and 30 other Top 40 hits between 1950 and 1969, became a musical variety TV program host in Philadelphia, retired in 1994 and died from renal failure on 11/27/2009, age 87
1928 ● Jimmy Dean / (Jimmy Ray Dean) → Country music singer and Grammy-winning crossover country-pop star, “Big Bad John” (#1, 1961), prime time TV variety show personality, breakfast sausage businessman and film actor, died of natural causes on 6/13/2010, age 81
1928 ● Eddie Fisher / (Edwin Jack Fisher) → Pop/adult contemporary crooner, “I Need You Now” (#1, 1954), TV actor, ex-husband of Debbie Reynolds, Elizabeth Taylor, Connie Stevens and 2 others, father of actresses Carrie Fisher (Star Wars, 1977) and Joely Fisher (TVs Ellen, 1994-98), died following hip surgery on 9/22/2010, age 82
1934 ● Jerry Crutchfield → Award-winning country-pop songwriter, record producer and music executive with a 60-year presence in the industry, starting as a member of gospel-pop The Escorts in the 50s, then as a songwriter with more than 150 compositions recorded by Elvis Presley, Linda Ronstadt and Peggy Lee (“My Whole World Is Falling Down,” #24, AC #8, 1963) among others, produced records for Glen Campbell, The Gatlin Brothers, Dave Loggins (“Please Come To Boston.” #5, EZ#1, 1974), Lee Greenwood (“God Bless The U.S.A.,” Country #7, 1984 and #16, 2001) and others, launched MCA Music Publishing in Nashville in the late 60s and built the business into an industry powerhouse, left in 1992 for a stint as the top executive manager at Capitol Records, served as a trustee for The National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (NARAS), died from undisclosed causes on 1/11/2022, age 87.
1939 ● Sal Cuomo → First tenor vocals for two hit wonder doo wop quartet The Regents, original “Barbara Ann” (#13, 1961) and “Run Around” (#28, 1961)
1940 ● Tunes Antunes / (Michael Antunes) → Saxophone player for New England one hit wonder rock ‘n’ roll bar band John Cafferty & The Beaver Brown Band, “On The Dark Side” (#7, 1983), acted with bandmates in the rock band-based movie Eddie & The Cruisers (1983)
1940 ● Bobby Hatfield → Blue-eyed soul singer and, with Bill Medley, one half of hugely successful pop-rock duo The Righteous Brothers, “Unchained Melody” (#4, 1965), died from a cocaine overdose while on tour on 11/5/2003, age 63
1943 ● Ronnie Spector / (Veronica Yvette Bennett) → Lead singer and frontwoman (ahead of sister Estelle Bennett and cousin Nedra Talley) in quintessential 60s pop “Wall of Sound” girl group The Ronettes and the anthemic “Be My Baby” (#2, 1963), married the band’s brilliant but troubled producer Phil Spector in 1968, largely locked from the public eye save for rare occasions until divorcing him in 1974, rebuilt her career and image singing duets, among them Southside Johnny (“You Mean So Much To Me,” 1976) and Eddie Money (“Take Me Home Tonight,” #4, 1986) as well as solo work, married her new manager, raised two sons, successfully sued Spector for back royalties, continued to record in collaborations and perform as Ronnie Spector and The Ronettes until dying from cancer on 1/12/2022, age 78.
1943 ● James Griffin → Songwriter, guitar and vocals for soft MOR pop-rock Bread, “Make It With You” (#1, 1970), co-wrote “For All We Know,” the 1971 Academy Award Best Song of the Year by the Carpenters from the movie Lovers And Other Strangers, issued several solo albums and performed in various country-rock combos through the early 00s, died from complications of cancer on 1/11/2005, age 61
1945 ● Larry Larden → With brother Dennis, guitar and vocals for one hit wonder pop-folk Every Mother’s Son, “Come On Down To My Boat” (#6, 1967)
1945 ● Brian Carman → Founding member, guitarist and songwriter for garage/surf rock The Chantays, co-wrote their instrumental hit “Pipeline” (#4, 1963), continued to perform with the band until his death from Crohn’s disease on 3/1/2015, age 69
1946 ● Mick Clarke / (Michael Clarke) → Bass vocals for glam rock/rock ‘n roll revival The Rubettes, “Sugar Baby Love” (UK #1, US #37, 1974)
1947 ● Ian Anderson → Frontman, flautist and vocals for long-lived Brit folk-rock http://bit.ly/JET371, “Living In The Past” (#11, 1973), solo
1949 ● Andy Cresswell-Davis → Co-founder, drummer and vocalist for New Wave pop-rock The Korgis, “Everybody’s Got To Learn Sometime” (#18, 1980), previously played on John Lennon‘s Imagine album, solo and sessions since The Korgis broke up for good in the early 90s
1950 ● Patti Austin → R&B/jazz-pop singer, “Baby Come to Me” (#1, 1983), duets with Michael Jackson, James Ingram and George Benson, backing vocals for Roberta Flack, Quincy Jones and others
1959 ● Mark Price → Drummer for goth-rock All About Eve, “Martha’s Harbour” (UK #10, 1988)
1961 ● Jon Farriss → Drummer for Aussie New Wave dance-groove-pop INXS, “Need You Tonight” (#1, 1987)
1962 ● Julia Fordham → Sultry-voiced jazz-pop singer and songwriter, backing singer for Mari Wilson and Kim Wilde, solo, “Happy Ever After” (Adult Contemporary #24, 1989) and “Wake Up With You (The I Wanna Song)” (Dance/Club #10, 2002)
1967 ● Lorraine Pearson → Vocals for Brit family R&B/dance-pop quintet 5 Star, “Can’t Wait Another Minute” (#41, Dance/Club #7, 1986) and fifteen Top 40 singles in native England
1967 ● Todd Nichols → Guitarist for alt pop-rock Toad The Wet Sprocket, “All I Want” (#15, 1992)
1968 ● Biv Bivins / (Michael Bivins) → Vocals for R&B/teen pop then hip hop/new jack swing vocal quartet New Edition, “If It Isn’t Love” (#7, 1988), then Bell Biv Devoe, “Poison” (#3, 1990)
1968 ● Leigh Marklew → Bassist for hard rock/heavy metal Terrorvision, “Tequila” (UK #2, 1999)
1972 ● Devon Allman → Guitarist, songwriter, vocalist, founder and bandleader for blues-rock Honeytribe, LP Space Age Blues debuted at #7 on Billboard‘s Blues Albums chart (2010), occasionally appears as a guest musician for his father, Gregg Allman and The Allman Brothers Band, currently in blues-rock supergroup Royal Southern Brotherhood with Cyril Neville and others
1977 ● Aaron Kamin → Co-founder and guitarist for post-grunge alt rock The Calling, “Wherever You Will Go” (#5, 2001)

August 11
1922 ● Ronald Erle Grainer → Australian-born, UK-based film and TV soundtrack composer, wrote score for To Sir, With Love (1967) and theme to BBC sci-fi TV show Doctor Who (1963-1986, 2005 to present) plus dozens of other films and programs, died from spinal cancer on 2/21/1981, age 58
1925 ● Mike Douglas / (Michael Delaney Dowd, Jr.) → Successful “Big Band” and pop singer, first with the Kay Kyser Band in the 40s and later in Los Angeles nightclubs, in the 60s became a widely popular talk show host of Emmy-winning, nationally-syndicated The Mike Douglas Show and a staunch supporter of all things Philadelphia, reprised his singing career with “The Men In My Little Girl’s Life” (#6, 1966), died from dehydration on 8/11/2006, his 81st birthday
1933 ● Walter Yetnikoff / (Walter Roy Yetnikoff) → Law school graduate who joined Columbia Records in 1962 as a staff attorney and rose to become president of the parent company’s international division in 1971 and to president of parent CBS Records itself in 1975, along the way helping create the successful joint venture between CBS and Sony, as president of CBS Records took an instrumental role in propelling to superstardom the careers of Michael Jackson, Billy Joel, Bruce Springsteen and many other lesser artists, known for his hard-working and hard-partying style in professional circles, his brash, abrasive persona caught up and got him fired from CBS Records by the senior management at Sony just three years after the full merger of the two he helped engineer, operated largely out of the limelight in later years in charitable pursuits, including as a volunteer in addiction programs, died of bladder cancer on 8/9/2021, age 87.
1937 ● Shel Talmy → Record producer and music arranger with a deep resume in a short period in the mid-60s, including British Invasion guitar rock bands The Kinks (“You Really Got Me,” #7, UK #1, 1964) and The Who (“I Can’t Explain,” #93, UK #8, 1965 and their debut album My Generation, UK #5, 1965), plus cult group The Creation, Aussie rock ‘n’ roller The Easybeats (“Friday On My Mind,” #16, UK #6, 1967), unsuccessful early songs for future star Boston, folk-rock The Pentangle, folk-pop Chad & Jeremy and others, “retired” from producing in the 70s
1939 ● Ronnie Dawson / (Ronald Monroe Dawson) → The “Blond Bomber,” rockabilly and rock ‘n’ roll guitarist and bandleader with several unremarkable 50s singles and extensive session work in the 60s, found relative success in the U.K. n the 80s and 90s and toured extensively, died from throat cancer on 9/30/2003, age 64
1942 ● Guy Villari → Lead vocals for two hit wonder doo wop quartet The Regents, original “Barbara Ann” (#13, 1961) and “Run Around” (#28, 1961)
1942 ● Mike Hugg → Drums, percussion and second longest surviving member of British Invasion pop-rock Manfred Mann, “Do Wah Diddy Diddy” (#1, 1964), film and TV theme composer, advertising jingle writer, solo artist
1943 ● Jim Kale / (Michael James Kale) → Bassist for Canadian rockers The Guess Who, “American Woman” (#1, 1970), has managed and toured with various reincarnations of the band through the 00s
1943 ● Kenny Gamble / (Kenneth Gamble) → With partner Leon Huff in the famed Philadelphia songwriting and production team of Gamble & Huff, crafted the “Philly soul” sound as the founders and chief creative team for Motown-rival Philadelphia International Records, wrote and produced dozens of hits from “Expressway To Your Heart” (The Soul Survivors, #4, R&B #3, 1967) to “Love Train” (The O’Jays, #1, R&B #1, 1972) and “Close the Door” (Teddy Pendergrass, #25, R&B #1, 1978), after the disco era the shine on the label faded but the two continued to write into the 10s
1943 ● Denis Payton / (Denis Archibald West Payton) → Horns and backing vocals for British Invasion pop-rock The Dave Clark Five, “Catch Us If You Can” (#4, 1965) and 13 other Top 20 hits in the US (but only nine in their home UK), died from cancer on 12/17/2006, age 63
1946 ● Michael Fonfora → Classically-trained, Canadian blues-rock keyboardist and member of short-lived 60s psych-rock The Electric Flag, then Elektra Records pre-fab rockers Rhinoceros and later Toronto rockers Blackstone, played with Lou Reed‘s band in the 70s and in 1990 joined influential retro blues-rock The Downchild Blues Band, inspiring Dan Akroyd and comedy partner John Belushi to form The Blues Brothers, played with the band until retiring in 2015, died from cancer on 1/8/2021, age 76.
1948 ● Bill Hurd → Keyboards for glam rock/rock ‘n roll revival The Rubettes, “Sugar Baby Love” (, US #37, 1974)
1949 ● Eric Carmen → Founding member, keyboards and vocals for Cleveland garage rock quartet The Choir, “It’s Cold Outside” (#68, 1967), then co-founded power pop The Raspberries, “Go All The Way” (#5, 1972), started soft rock solo career in 1975, “All By Myself” (#2, 1976) and six other Top 40 hits
1950 ● Erik Braunn / (Erik Keith Braunn) → Teenaged guitarist for psych-rock Iron Butterfly, “In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida” (#30, 1970),left in 1969 for session work and production until his death from a birth defect-related heart attack on 7/25/2003, age 53
1952 ● Bob Mothersbaugh → Founding member, lead guitarist and vocalist for quirky 80s pop-rock Devo, “Whip It” (#14, 1980), also produced soundtracks for film and television, including the Rugrats series during the 90s, rejoined Devo bandmates in music production company Mutato Muzika
1954 ● Bryan Bassett → Guitar and vocals for one hit wonder funk-pop Wild Cherry, “Play That Funky Music” (#1, 1976), started music producer career in the 80s, toured with hard rock Foghat and Southern hard rock Molly Hatchet in the 90s and 00s
1954 ● Joe Jackson / (David Ian Jackson) → Punk-challenging British New Wave pop-rock singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist, “Steppin’ Out” (#6, 1982), moved into eclectic pop-jazz-classical fusion in the 90s, won Grammy Award – Best Pop Instrumental Album in 2000 for Jackson: Symphony 1
1956 ● Alan Frew → Vocals for Canadian pop-rock Glass Tiger, “Don’t Forget Me (When I’m Gone)” (#2, 1986), solo
1957 ● Richie Ramone / (Richard Reinhardt) → Drummer and songwriter, joined punk rock The Ramones in 1983, wrote hit song “Somebody Put Something In My Drink” (1986)
1958 ● Jah Wobble / (John Joseph Wardle) → Bassist, vocalist, songwriter and co-founder of punk rock Public Image Ltd., “This Is Not A Love Song” (UK #5, 1983), solo
1960 ● Paul Gendler → Guitarist for Brit dance-pop band Modern Romance, “Can You Move” (Dance/Club #2, 1981) and “Best Years Of Our Lives” (UK #4, 1982)
1962 ● Bragi Ólafsson → Bassist for Icelandic alt pop-rock The Sugarcubes, “Hit” (Modern Rock #1, 1991)
1964 ● Hamish Seelochan → Vocals in Brit R&B/neo-soul-funk The Pasadenas, “Tribute (Right On)” (Dance/Club #27, UK #5, 1988)
1968 ● Charlie Sexton → Blues-rock guitarist, singer, songwriter, bandleader and solo artist, “Beat’s So Lonely” (#17, 1985) from his debut album at age 16, sessions for Bob Dylan, Keith Richards, Ron Wood and others
1970 ● Ali Shaheed Muhammad → DJ/producer for artistic hip hop jazz-rap fusion trio A Tribe Called Quest, “Check The Rhime” (Rap #1, 1991), solo, producer
1970 ● Andy Bell → Guitar and vocals for Brit neo-psych “shoegazing” band Ride, “Twisterella” (Modern Rock #12, 1992), later Hurricane , joined Oasis in 1999
1976 ● Ben Gibbard → Vocals for indie pop/rock Death Cab For Cutie, “Soul Meets Body” (Modern Rock #5, 2005)
1976 ● Brendan Bayliss → Founding member, lead guitarist and vocalist for neo-prog rock jam band Umphrey’s McGee, album Mantis (#62, Indie #6, 2009)
1978 ● Mack Daddy / (Chris Kelly) → Vocals for teen sensation pop-rap duo Kriss Kross, “Jump” (#1, 1992), died from an apparent drug overdose on 5/1/2013, age 34
1981 ● Sandi Thom → Scottish neo-folk-rock singer/songwriter, “I Wish I Was a Punk Rocker (With Flowers In My Hair)”, the first song to reach UK #1 based solely on the strength of downloads
1985 ● Asher Roth → White suburban rapper, “I Love College” (#12, 2009), built an early following through web sites Facebook and MySpace
1985 ● J-Boog / (Jarell Houston) → Vocals for R&B/hip hop urban boy band B2K, “Bump, Bump, Bump” (#1, 2002)

August 12
1918 ● Sid Bernstein → Music producer, promoter and concert impresario best known for bringing The Beatles to New York’s Carnegie Hall in 1964 and Shea Stadium in 1965, also booked shows in New York for The Rolling Stones, Herman’s Hermits, The Moody Blues, The Kinks and other British Invasion bands, managed The Rascals and Laura Nyro in the 60s and early 70s, later arranged tours for Jimi Hendrix, Fleetwood Mac and others, died at age 95 on 8/21/2013, age 95
1918 ● Roy C. Bennett / (Israel Brodsky) → Songwriter and collaborator with Sid Tepper, with whom he wrote over 300 songs, including “Red Roses For A Blue Lady” for Vaughn Monroe (#4, 1948), “The Young Ones” for Cliff Richard (UK #1, 1962) and over 40 for Elvis Presley, died of natural causes on 7/2/2015, age 96
1920 ● Percy Mayfield → R&B balladeer and songwriter, solo artist, “Please Send Me Someone To Love” (R&B #1, 1950), wrote “Hit The Road Jack” for Ray Charles (#1, 1961), died following a heart attack on 8/11/1984, age 63
1926 ● Joe Jones → New Orleans R&B singer, songwriter and arranger, pianist for B. B. King, solo artist, “You Talk To Much” (#3, 1960), record producer and manager for various R&B acts, including girl group The Dixie Cups, died following heart bypass surgery on 11/27/2005, age 79.
1927 ● Porter Wagoner → Country-pop megastar known for his rhinestone-encrusted suits, pompadour hairdo, 16 Country Top 10 hits, including “The Carroll County Accident” (#92, Country #2, 1968) and multiple duet albums and hits with protégée Dolly Parton (“Please Don’t Stop Loving Me,” Country #1, 1974), toured and performed at the Grand Ole Opry until just before his death from lung caner on 10/28/2007, age 80
1929 ● Buck Owens / (Alvis Edgar Owens, Jr.) → Country music megastar singer, songwriter and guitarist, pioneer of the “Bakersfield sound” blending country and pop, “I’ve Got A Tiger By The Tail” (#25, Country #1, 1965) and 19 other Country #1 hits, The Beatles covered his “Act Naturally” (#47, 1965), bandleader for The Buckaroos, TV host (Hee Haw), died after lengthy illnesses on 3/24/2006 , age 76
1944 ● Larry Troutman → With three of his brothers and two non-family members, co-founder, percussion and backing vocals in underrated but influential funk sextet Zapp, “More Bounce To The Ounce” (R&B #2, 1980), shot and killed his brother and bandmate Roger Troutman in an apparent murder/suicide on 4/25/1999, age 54
1945 ● Joe Rascoff / (Joseph Fishel Rascoff) → New York City accounting firm partner who left in the early 70s to manage road financial affairs for The Rolling Stones, his company later expanded to business management and tour production for The Allman Brothers Band, David Bowie, U2, Paul Simon, Sting and others and advised artists on royalty negotiations and accounting, briefly led electronic dance music producer SFX Entertainment in the 10s before retiring, died firm prostate cancer on 4/6/2017, age 71
1948 ● Ron Mael → With brother Russell Mael, keyboardist for quirky pop-rock Sparks, “This Town Ain’t Big Enough For The Both Of Us” (UK #2, 1974) and “Just Got Back From Heaven” (Dance/Club #7, 1989)
1949 ● Mark Knopfler → Frontman, lead guitar, songwriter and vocals for post-punk New Wave rock Dire Straits, “Sultans Of Swing” (#4, 1979), solo, Notting Hillbillies
1950 ● Craig Douglas / (Terence Perkins) → Early Brit pop-rock singer, “Only Sixteen” (UK #1, 1959) plus nine other UK Top 40 singles
1950 ● Kid Creole / (Thomas August Darnell Browder) → Guitarist, songwriter and frontman for multi-genre, big band-style Latin-tinged pop-rock Kid Creole & The Coconuts, “It’s A Wonderful Thing, Baby” (Dance Club #18, UK #4, 1982)
1953 ● Jerry Speiser → Drummer for Scottish-Australian Men At Work, “Down Under” (#1, UK #1, 1983), their Grammy-winning debut album, Business As Usual, was simultaneously the #1 US and UK album in January 1983, gaining them the distinction of being the only Aussie band to hold all four top spots at once
1954 ● Pat Metheny → Seventeen-time Grammy-winning jazz-rock fusion guitarist, composer and bandleader, sessions and side projects with David Bowie, Gary Burton, Chick Corea and many others
1958 ● Jürgen Dehmel → Bassist for German pop-rock band Nena, “99 Luftballons” (#2, 1984)
1961 ● Roy Hay → Guitar and vocals for New Wave synth-pop Culture Club, “Karma Chameleon” (#1, 1984) plus seven other UK top 10 singles
1963 ● Sir Mix-A-Lot / (Anthony Ray) → Hip hop MC, producer and rapper, “Baby Got Back” (#1, 1992) which one a Grammy for Best Rap Performance
1968 ● Paul Tucker → Keyboards for Brit R&B/Northern soul duo Lighthouse Family,”Lifted” (UK #4, 1996) and 9 other UK Top 40 hits
1969 ● Tanita Tikaram → Brit folk-pop singer and songwriter, “Twist In My Sobriety” (Modern Rock #25, UK #22, 1988)

August 13
1921 ● Jimmy McCracklin / (James David Walker, Jr.) → West Coast blues pianist and songwriter with a seven decade recording and performing career and hundreds of songs and over 30 albums, best known for his blues/dance “The Walk” (#7, R&B #5, 1958), died from natural causes on 12/20/2012, age 91
1930 ● Don Ho / (Donald Tai Loy Ho) → Air Force fighter pilot turned iconic Hawaiian pop/island music singer and entertainer with the signature song, “Tiny Bubbles” (#57, 1966), appeared in Honolulu and Vegas nightclubs over a 50-year career, guested on 70s TV sitcoms and briefly hosted his own program, suffered from coronary problems for many years but continued to perform until just before his death from heart failure on 4/14/2007, age 76
1938 ● Baby Cortez / (David Cortez Clowney) → Pop and R&B organist with two Top 10 instrumentals, “The Happy Organ” (#1, 1959), the first instrumental #1 and the first major pop hit to feature an electric organ, and “Rinky Dink” (#10, 1962), faded from view by the late 60s
1939 ● Howard Tate → R&B/soul singer and songwriter with several minor chart hits, including “Ain’t Nobody Home” (#63, R&B #12, 1966) but best known for penning “Get It While You Can” by Janis Joplin (#78, 1971), died from leukemia on 12/2/2011, age 72
1940 ● John Stokes / (Sean James Stokes) → With brothers Con and Dec Cluskey, founding member, vocals, bass guitar and harmonica in Irish beat pop-rock trio The Bachelors, “Diane” (#10, UK #1, 1964) and seven other UK Top 10 hits in 1964-66, following a split in 1984 formed pop-rock Stokes & Coe
1947 ● David Ivor St. Hubbins → Fictional character (lead singer and rhythm guitarist) played by Michael McKean in the “mock-rock” parody band Spinal Tap from the movie This Is Spinal Tap (1984)
1948 ● Tony Santini / (Scott Powell) → Vocals with “greaser” revival parody rock-and-doo-wop Sha Na Na (“(Just Like) Romeo And Juliet,” #55, 1975), TV actor, physician
1949 ● Cliff Fish → Original bassist for pop/rock one hit wonder Paper Lace, “The Night Chicago Died” (#1, UK #3, 1974), a second single “Billy, Don’t Be A Hero” (#96, UK #1, 1974) qualifies them as a two hit wonder in the UK
1949 ● Jonathan Arendt → Bassist for pop/rock one hit wonder Paper Lace, “The Night Chicago Died” (#1, UK #3, 1974), a second single “Billy, Don’t Be A Hero” (#96, UK #1, 1974) qualifies them as a two hit wonder in the UK
1951 ● Dan Fogelberg → Quintessential 70s-80s country-pop-rock singer/songwriter, “Part Of The Plan” (#31, 1975) and “Leader Of The Band” (#9, Adult Contemporary #1, 1982), political and environmental activist, died from prostate cancer on 12/16/2007, age 56
1951 ● Ric Parnell / (Richard John Parnell) → Journeyman English drummer with a variety of bands in the 70s and 80s, including prog rock Atomic Rooster, Italian pop-rockers Tritons and jazz-fusion Nova, session work in both decades led to drumming on Toni Basil‘s “Mickey” (#1, UK #2, 1981), best known for portraying drummer Mick Shrimpton in the “mock-rock” parody band Spinal Tap from the movie This Is Spinal Tap (1984), the only real musician in a fake band of otherwise comic actors, continued to tour and record with Spinal Tap as a working band before relocating to Montana in the 90s and hosting an overnight radio program featuring eclectic music, suffered organ failure after a blood clot formed in his lungs and died on 5/1/2022, age 70.
1952 ● Hughie Thomasson / (Hugh Edward Thomasson) → Founding member, lead singer and guitarist for Southern hard rock Outlaws (“Hurry Sundown,” #34, 1975), disbanded the group in 1996 and joined raunchy Southern rockers Lynyrd Skynyrd (“Sweet Home Alabama,” #8, 1974), reformed Outlaws in 2005 and toured until dying in his sleep from a heart attack on 9/9/2007, age 55
1958 ● Feargal Sharkey → Guitarist for Irish punk/New Wave pop-rock The Undertones, “My Perfect Cousin” (UK #9, 1980), solo, “A Good Heart” (#74, UK #1, 1985)
1959 ● Danny Bonaduce → Vocals and bass guitar in the pre-fab TV show sunshine pop group The Partridge Family, “I Think I Love You” (#1, 1970), producer, reality TV show host and panelist
1959 ● Mark Nevin → Vocals and songwriter for Brit neo-skiffle pop Fairground Attraction, “Perfect” (#80, UK #1, 1988)
1959 ● Michael Bradley → Bassist for Irish punk/New Wave pop-rock The Undertones, “My Perfect Cousin” (UK #9, 1980)
1964 ● Ian Haugland / (Håkan Jan Haugland) → Drummer for Swedish hard rock/glam-metal Europe, “The Final Countdown” (#8, 1986)
1984 ● “Baby Blue” Smith / (Diamond Blue Smith) → Vocals for Miami-based R&B/hip-hop quartet Pretty Ricky, “Grind With Me” (#7, 2005)
1984 ● James Morrison / (James Morrison Catchpole) → Award-winning Brit soul-pop singer/songwriter and guitarist, “You Give Me Something” (UK #5, 2006) from his first album Undiscovered, which debuted at #1 on the UK albums chart

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