This Week’s Birthdays (August 13 – 19)

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Dan Fogelberg

Happy Birthday this week to:

August 13
1921 ● Jimmy McCracklin / (James David Walker, Jr.) → West Coast blues pianist and songwriter with a seven decade recording and performing career and hundreds of songs and over 30 albums, best known for his blues/dance “The Walk” (#7, R&B #5, 1958), died from natural causes on 12/20/2012, age 91
1930 ● Don Ho / (Donald Tai Loy Ho) → Air Force fighter pilot turned iconic Hawaiian pop/island music singer and entertainer with the signature song, “Tiny Bubbles” (#57, 1966), appeared in Honolulu and Vegas nightclubs over a 50-year career, guested on 70s TV sitcoms and briefly hosted his own program, suffered from coronary problems for many years but continued to perform until just before his death from heart failure on 4/14/2007, age 76.
1938 ● Baby Cortez / (David Cortez Clowney) → Pop and R&B organist with two Top 10 instrumentals, “The Happy Organ” (#1, 1959), the first instrumental #1 and the first major pop hit to feature an electric organ, and “Rinky Dink” (#10, 1962), faded from view by the late 60s
1939 ● Howard Tate → R&B/soul singer and songwriter with several minor chart hits, including “Ain’t Nobody Home” (#63, R&B #12, 1966) but best known for penning “Get It While You Can” by Janis Joplin (#78, 1971), died from leukemia on 12/2/2011, age 72
1940 ● John Stokes / (Sean James Stokes) → With brothers Con and Dec Cluskey, founding member, vocals, bass guitar and harmonica in Irish beat pop-rock trio The Bachelors, “Diane” (#10, UK #1, 1964) and seven other UK Top 10 hits in 1964-66, following a split in 1984 formed pop-rock Stokes & Coe
1942 ● Eddie “Charlie Brown” Weiss / (Edward Weiss) → Using the stage name “Charlie Brown” from The Coasters‘ hit (#2, R&B #2, UK #6, 1959), longtime radio DJ generally credited with coining the term and then championing Beach music, the R&B/soul-based soundtrack to Carolina beach parties in the 50s, 60s and 70s, convinced Atlantic Records to release two albums of Beach music, Beach Beat and Beach Beat Vol. 2 in the late 60s and spent nearly five decades on-air celebrating the genre and its spinoff dance craze, the “shag” (now the official dance of the two Carolina states and a staple of dance competitions worldwide), hosted the weekly “On the Beach” syndicated program broadcast on over 40 stations in the Southeast, retired in 2014, lived with declining health in his last years and died after a short, undisclosed illness on 20/08/2022, age 80.
1947 ● David Ivor St. Hubbins → Fictional character (lead singer and rhythm guitarist) played by Michael McKean in the “mock-rock” parody band Spinal Tap from the movie This Is Spinal Tap (1984)
1947 ● Mick Slattery → Original guitarist and 1969 co-founder of space rock pioneers Hawkwind (debut single “Hurry On Sundown,” 1970), left the group by 1970 and passed out of the spotlight until resurfacing decades later to perform and record with former Hawkwind musicians in hard rock Space Ritual and bassist Alan Davey’s Hawkestrel project, died at home following a short, unspecified illness on 3/17/2023, age 77.
1948 ● Tony Santini / (Scott Powell) → Vocals with “greaser” revival parody rock-and-doo-wop Sha Na Na (“(Just Like) Romeo And Juliet,” #55, 1975), TV actor, physician
1949 ● Cliff Fish / (Clifford Victor Fish) → Bass guitarist and co-founding member of Brit pop-rock Paper Lace and three UK Top 20 hits in a single year: “The Night Chicago Died” (#1, UK #3, 1974), “Billy Don’t Be A Hero” (#96, UK #1, 1974) and “The Black-Eyed Boys” (#41, UK #11, 1974), left the band in 1980 but returned in the 90s and toured with one of two competing Paper Lace offshoots, died from cancer on 4/14/2023, age 73.
1949 ● Jonathan Arendt → Early bassist for pop/rock one hit wonder Paper Lace and three UK Top 20 hits in a single year: “The Night Chicago Died” (#1, UK #3, 1974), “Billy Don’t Be A Hero” (#96, UK #1, 1974) and “The Black-Eyed Boys” (#41, UK #11, 1974)
1951 ● Dan Fogelberg / (Daniel Grayling Fogelberg) → Quintessential 70s-80s country-pop-rock singer/songwriter with eleven Top 40 hits, including “Part Of The Plan” (#31, 1975) and “Leader Of The Band” (#9, Adult Contemporary #1, 1982), released fifteen studio albums from 1972 to 2003, several of them platinum sellers, plus two albums with jazz flautist Tim Weissberg, championed various environmental causes from his working ranch in Colorado and cabin in Maine, died from prostate cancer on 12/16/2007, age 56.
1951 ● Ric Parnell / (Richard John Parnell) → Journeyman English drummer with a variety of bands in the 70s and 80s, including prog rock Atomic Rooster, Italian pop-rockers Tritons and jazz-fusion Nova, session work in both decades led to drumming on Toni Basil‘s “Mickey” (#1, UK #2, 1981), best known for portraying drummer Mick Shrimpton in the “mock-rock” parody band Spinal Tap from the movie This Is Spinal Tap (1984), the only real musician in a fake band of otherwise comic actors, continued to tour and record with Spinal Tap as a working band before relocating to Montana in the 90s and hosting an overnight radio program featuring eclectic music, suffered organ failure after a blood clot formed in his lungs and died on 5/1/2022, age 70.
1952 ● Hughie Thomasson / (Hugh Edward Thomasson) → Founding member, lead singer and guitarist for Southern hard rock Outlaws (“Hurry Sundown,” #34, 1975), disbanded the group in 1996 and joined raunchy Southern rockers Lynyrd Skynyrd (“Sweet Home Alabama,” #8, 1974), reformed Outlaws in 2005 and toured until dying in his sleep from a heart attack on 9/9/2007, age 55
1958 ● Feargal Sharkey → Guitarist for Irish punk/New Wave pop-rock The Undertones, “My Perfect Cousin” (UK #9, 1980), solo, “A Good Heart” (#74, UK #1, 1985)
1959 ● Danny Bonaduce → Vocals and bass guitar in the pre-fab TV show sunshine pop group The Partridge Family, “I Think I Love You” (#1, 1970), producer, reality TV show host and panelist
1959 ● Mark Nevin → Vocals and songwriter for Brit neo-skiffle pop Fairground Attraction, “Perfect” (#80, UK #1, 1988)
1959 ● Michael Bradley → Bassist for Irish punk/New Wave pop-rock The Undertones, “My Perfect Cousin” (UK #9, 1980)
1964 ● Ian Haugland / (Håkan Jan Haugland) → Drummer for Swedish hard rock/glam-metal Europe, “The Final Countdown” (#8, 1986)
1984 ● “Baby Blue” Smith / (Diamond Blue Smith) → Vocals for Miami-based R&B/hip-hop quartet Pretty Ricky, “Grind With Me” (#7, 2005)
1984 ● James Morrison / (James Morrison Catchpole) → Award-winning Brit soul-pop singer/songwriter and guitarist, “You Give Me Something” (UK #5, 2006) from his first album Undiscovered, which debuted at #1 on the UK albums chart

August 14
1915 ● Alyce King / (Alice Golda Driggs Clarke) → Vocalist for complex and sophisticated four-part harmony 30s, 40s and 50s Big Band/pop sibling singing group The King Sisters, “The Hut-Sut Song” (Top 30, 1944), recorded with her sisters on hundreds of albums and numerous radio specials over three decades and in the musical-variety TV program The King Family Show (1966-1969) and holiday specials thereafter, died from respiratory problems on 8/23/1996, age 81
1924 ● Lee Adams → Musical theater lyricist best known for his collaborations with Charles Strouse, including Tony-winners Bye Bye Birdie (1960) and Applause (1970), and co-writing the opening theme to the 70s TV sitcom All In The Family (“Those Were The Days”)
1926 ● Buddy Greco / (Armando Joseph Greco) → Jazz-pop pianist and Las Vegas lounge singer, member of Benny Goodman‘s band in the mid-40s and Frank Sinatra‘s “Rat Pack” in the 60s, enjoyed a long and prolific solo career, covered “Mr. Lonely” (#64, 1962) and issued over 60 albums and 100 singles, performed into the 00s and died on 1/10/2017, age 90
1940 ● Dash Crofts / (Darrell Crofts) → Guitar, mandolin, vocals and songwriting for 70s light pop-rock duo Seals & Crofts, “Summer Breeze” (#6, 1972) and “Diamond Girl” (#6, 1973)
1941 ● Connie Smith / (Constance June Meador) → Hugely popular 60s and 70s female country artist with 20 singles in the Country 10 and three Country #1 albums but extremely limited recognition on the mainstream pop side, “Once A Day” (#101, Country #1, 1964) was her first overall single and her highest charting song on the Billboard Hot 100, continues to persevere as a gospel singer in the 10s.
1941 ● David Crosby / (David Van Cortlandt Crosby) → Guitarist, singer, songwriter, and founding member of two important rock acts, seminal 60s folk-country-rock The Byrds (“Mr. Tambourine Man,” #1, 1965) and 70s harmony folk-pop supergroup Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young (“Just A Song Before I Go,” #7, 1977), released three albums in the mid-70s (and a fourth in 2004) as a duet with Graham Nash, including Wind On The Water (#6, 1975), as a solo artist issued eight albums altogether and eleven singles, including “Drive My Car” (Mainstream Rock #3, 1989), the last album being For Free (2021), suffered from alcoholism and drug addiction, and resultant health issues, for decades until his death following a long, undisclosed illness on 1/18/2023, age 81.
1941 ● Lionel Morton → Vocals and rhythm guitar for early 60s Brit pop The Four Pennies, “Juliet” (UK #1, 1964), the most important British Invasion era act with no chart presence in the US
1946 ● Larry Graham → Bassist for R&B/soul-funk Sly & The Family Stone, “Family Affair” (#1, 1971), then founder/frontman funk band Graham Central Station
1947 ● Maddy Prior / (Madelaine Edith Prior) → Lead vocals for Brit electric folk-rock revival band Steeleye Span, “All Around My Hat” (UK #5, 1975)
1948 ● Bruce Thomas → Bassist for Elvis Costello‘s backing band The Attractions, “Pump It Up” (UK #24, 1978), session work and author
1951 ● Slim Dunlap / (Bob Dunlap) → Lead guitar for garage punk then alt rock pioneers The Replacements, “I’ll Be You” (Mainstream Rock #1, 1989), solo
1956 ● Sharon Bryant → Lead vocals for R&B/soul urban contemporary Atlantic Starr, “When Love Calls” (R&B #5, 1979), solo, sessions
1960 ● Sarah Brightman → Brit classical-pop-Broadway crossover singer and actress, dancer and vocals for disco Hot Gossip “I Lost My Heart To A Starship Trooper” (UK #6, 1978), played Jemima in Cats (1981) and Christine Daaé in Phantom Of The Opera (1986), solo, “Harem” (Dance/Club #1, 2003)
1961 ● Tim Quy / (Timothy Graham Quy) → Sound engineer and back-up bassist for English indie prog/pop-rock Cardiacs in the late 70s, became full-time percussionist in 1981 and a key part of the band’s classic sextet lineup, performed on all releases through the band’s 1990 dissolution, including “Is This The Life?” (UK #80, 1988), in 90s and 00s became an IT consultant, data analyst and real estate developer until a 2018 cancer diagnosis, died from the disease on 2/2/2023, age 61.
1963 ● Jez Willis → Partner/producer in Brit dance-pop duo Utah Saints, “Something Good” (UK #4, 1992)
1965 ● Mark Collins → Guitarist for “Madchester” alt rock The Charlatans UK, “The Only One I Know” (Mainstream Rock #37, 1991) and three UK #1 albums
1970 ● Kevin Cadogan → Lead guitar for post-grunge indie pop Third Eye Blind, “Semi-Charmed Life” (#4, 1997)
1974 ● Ana Matronic / (Ana Lynch) → Vocals and frontwoman for dance-glam-rock Scissor Sisters, “Filthy Gorgeous” (Dance/Club #1, 2005)
1977 ● Ed Harcourt → Multi-instrumentalist Brit chamber pop singer/songwriter, “All Of Your Days Will Be Blessed” (UK #35, 2003)

August 15
1896 ● Léon Theremin / (Lev Sergeyevich Termen) → Russian inventor of the theremin, one of the first electronic musical instruments and which he debuted with the New York Philharmonic in 1928, died of natural causes on 11/3/1993, age 97
1909 ● Hugo Winterhalter → Orchestral-pop and easy listening arranger with 40 years of credits on Broadway, in films, on TV, and on the Billboard Hot 100, including “Canadian Sunset” (#2, R&B #7, 1956), died from cancer on 9/17/1973, age 64
1911 ● Buster Brown → Rustic R&B/blues singer and harmonica player whose biggest of three hits, “Fannie Mae” (#38, R&B #1, 1960) came when he was 50 year old, died 1/31/1976, age 64
1925 ● Bill Pinkney → Co-founder and first tenor for R&B/soul-doo wop The Drifters, “Up On The Roof” (#5, 1963), was the last surviving member of the group’s original lineup when he died after a heart attack on 7/4/2007, age 81
1930 ● Jackie Brenston → Tenor saxophonist and one hit wonder singer with a legitimate claim to the first rock ‘n’ roll record, “Rocket 88” (R&B #1, 1951), recorded at Sun Studios in Memphis with Ike Turner‘s Kings Of Rhythm as the backing band (credited as the Delta Cats), saw no further chart action and became a session musician and later a truck driver, died following an alcoholism-induced heart attack on 12/15/2007, age 49
1932 ● Johnny Thunder / (Gil Hamilton) → Session backing singer and one hit wonder novelty R&B/soul and pop soloist, “Loop De Loop” (#4, R&B #6, 1963), continued to record through the 60s with no further success, still tours on the oldies circuit
1933 ● Floyd Ashton → Vocals for R&B/soul The Tams, “What Kind Of Fool (Do You Think I Am)” (#9, 1963)
1933 ● Bobby Helms → Country-pop crossover singer with seven Country Top 40 and Five Pop Top 40, but best known as the first to record “Jingle Bell Rock” (#6, Country #13, 1957), the holiday standard since recorded by thousands of artists and now heard millions of times each year, died from emphysema on 6/19/1997, age 63
1933 ● Mike Seeger → Half-brother of folk legend Pete Seeger, award-winning folk musician and important music historian, co-founding member of influential folk revival/string band the New Lost City Ramblers and later the Strange Creek Singers, issued two dozen solo albums and produced dozens of documentary recordings of traditional American music, died from cancer on 8/7/2009, age 75
1934 ● Bobby Howard Byrd → Singer, songwriter and frontman for The Flames, which became James Brown‘s backing band The Famous Flames, later scored a handful of minor R&B and crossover hits as a solo artist, including “I Need Help (I Can’t Do It Alone) Pt. 1” (#69, R&B #14, 1970), just a few months after performing at Brown‘s memorial service died of cancer on 9/12/2007, age 73
1938 ● Shan Palmer / (Sheila Palmer) → Vocals for English pop trio The Kaye Sisters, “Ivory Tower” (UK #20, 1956)
1938 ● Stix Hooper / (Nesbert Hooper) → Jazz-fusion drummer with The Jazz Crusaders (The Crusaders after 1971), “Street Life” (#36, 1979), solo, sessions
1939 ● Norma Waterson / (Norma Christine Watersons) → Leading and influential figure on the British traditional-folk revival scene in the early 60s, co-founded and fronted renowned family harmony group The Watersons, performed with her siblings, children, cousins, and husband, noted Brit folk singer-songwriter-guitarist Mike McCarthy, in various incarnations over 40 years, issued five solo albums between 1996 and the last, Anchor, in 2018, died from pneumonia on 1/30/2022, age 87.
1941 ● Don Rich → Country guitarist and pioneer of the “Bakersfield sound” of electrified country and pop crafted during his years as right-hand man to superstar Buck Owens (“I’ve Got A Tiger By The Tail” (#25, Country #1, 1965 and 19 other Country #1 hits), played with Owens‘s backing band The Buckaroos and issued several solo albums, died in a motorcycle accident on 7/17/1974, age 32
1942 ● Eddie Phillips → Guitarist for underappreciated and little known (except in Germany) Britbeat/power pop The Creation, “Painter Man” (UK #36, GER #8, 1967)
1942 ● Peter York → Drummer for Brit pop-rock Spencer Davis Group, “Gimme Some Lovin”” (#7, 1967), then Eric Clapton‘s short lived Powerhouse, solo, organized the “Superdrumming” series of shows with different bandmembers
1946 ● Jimmy Webb → Grammy-winning professional rock composer and lyricist, wrote “Up Up and Away” for The 5th Dimension (#7, 1967), “MacArthur Park” for Richard Harris (#2, 1968), “Galveston” for Glen Campbell (#4, 1969), producer and film score arranger
1948 ● Kate Taylor → Folk-rockabilly singer/songwriter and guitarist, covered “It’s In His Kiss (The Shoop Shoop Song)” (#49, 1977), sister of folk-pop legend James Taylor
1950 ● Joey Spampinato → Founding member, bassist, vocals and songwriting for 40-year cult roots rock bar band NRBQ (New Rhythm And Blues Quintet)
1950 ● Tom Aldrich → Journeyman rock drummer for Southern raunch-rock Black Oak Arkansas, “Jim Dandy To The Rescue” (Top 30, 1973), then bluesy hard rock The Pat Travers Band, “New Age Music” (Mainstream Rock #33, 1981), later with Ozzy Osbourne, Gary Moore, Whitesnake and others.
1951 ● Bobby Caldwell / (Robert Hunter Caldwell) → Smooth jazz/blue-eyed soul crooner and accomplished songwriter with multiple Top 100 hits, including his biggest as an artist, “What You Won’t Do For Love” (#9, R&B #6, 1979), co-wrote Grammy-nominated “The Next Time I Fall”(#1, AC #1, 1986) for Peter Cetera and Amy Grant, moved to a Big Band sound in the 90s and continued tour and record into the 10s, suffered from long-term effects of antibiotics taken for undisclosed illnesses, died at home on 3/14/2023, age 71.
1952 ● Mike Somerville / (Michael A. Somerville) → Lead guitarist and songwriter for Midwest AOR Head East, wrote their two most memorable original songs, “Never Been Any Reason” (#68, 1975) and “Love Me Tonight” (#46, 1975), moved to other projects when the band splintered in 1980 but returned in 1994 and stayed through the early 2000s, played in the 50th anniversary tour in 2018, died following an undisclosed illness on 2/28/2020, age 67.
1961 ● Matt Johnson → Founder, frontman, vocals, songwriter and only constant member of eclectic alt pop-dance-rock The The, “Dogs Of Lust” (Modern Rock #2, 1993), solo
1962 ● Marcia Schofield → Keyboards from 1987-90 for 35+ year punk and post-punk The Fall, “There’s A Ghost In My House” (UK #30, 1987), left for a career as a palliative care doctor
1972 ● Mikey Graham / (Michael Graham) → Vocals for Irish teen-pop boy band Boyzone, “No Matter What” (Adult Contemporary #12, 1999)
1972 ● Tim Foreman → Bassist for Grammy-winning alt rock/Christian rock Switchfoot, “Meant To Live” (#18, Modern Rock #5, 2004)
1984 ● David Welsh → Lead guitar for mainstream/piano rock The Fray, “How To Save A Life” (#3, 2006)
1984 ● Ted Dwane → Bassist for Grammy-winning Brit folk-rock Mumford & Sons, “I Will Wait” (#12, Alt Rock #1, 2012)
1989 ● Joe Jonas → Lead singer with brothers Nick and Kevin in pre-fab Disney Channel teen-pop ballad trio the Jonas Brothers, “Burnin’ Up” (#5, 2008)

August 16
1915 ● Al Hibbler → Baritone jazz-pop-R&B singer, first with Duke Ellington‘s orchestra in the 40s, “Do Nothin’ Til You Here From Me” (#6, 1944), then solo, “Unchained Melody” (#3, 1955), died 4/24/2001, age 85
1922 ● Ernie Freeman / (Ernest Aaron Freeman) → Pop and early rock ‘n’ roll bandleader, pianist and session musician, worked on hits by The Platters (“The Great Pretender,” #1, 1956), Dean Martin (“Everybody Loves Somebody,” #1, 1964), Frank Sinatra (“That’s Life,” #4, 1966) and others, wrote film scores and served as musical director at Reprise Records, died at home from a heart attack on 5/16/1981, age 58
1923 ● Johnny Reed → Founding member, bass vocals and double bass for doo wop and “bird group” trendsetting R&B vocal group The Orioles (“Crying In The Chapel,” #11, R&B #1, 1953) last surviving original member of the group when he died on 6/18/2005, age 81
1923 ● Eddie Kirkland → Electric blues guitarist, singer and songwriter known as the “Gypsy of the Blues” for his rigorous touring schedule, released over 30 albums on various labels and toured with John Lee Hooker, Muddy Waters, English blues-rock band Foghat and others, continued to record, write and tour until his death in a car accident on 2/27/2011, age 87.
1931 ● Eydie Gormé / (Edith Gormezano) → Broadway and TV actress, nightclub and Vegas showroom entertainer, Grammy-winning traditional pop singer, “Blame It On The Bossa Nova” (#7, 1963), wife and singing partner of crooner Steve Lawrence, died from undisclosed causes on 8/10/2013, age 82
1934 ● Ketty Lester / (Revoyda Frierson) → One hit wonder pop singer and actress with the crossover cover of “Love Letters” (#5, R&B #2, UK #5, 1962), shifted to a more-R&B style in the late 60s with little commercial success, turned to acting in the 70s and appeared in movies and on TV in various roles
1939 ● Billy Joe Shaver → Rough-cut, pioneering Texas “outlaw country” songwriter and guitarist with 17 mostly forgotten studio albums, the last of which was the only one to chart (Long In The Tooth, #157, Country #19, 2014), but whose whose legacy in outlaw country music is deep, including essentials “Georgia On A Fast Train,” “Live Forever” and “Old Five and Dimers Like Me,” nine of the 10 songs on Waylon Jennings’ non-conformist breakthrough album Honky Tonk Heroes (#185, Country #14, 1973), and cover recordings by Bobby Bare, Johnny Cash, Kris Kristofferson and Elvis Presley, suffered a heart attack on stage in 2001 but recovered to continue touring and recording until his death following a massive stroke on 10/28/2020, age 81.
1939 ● Eric Weissberg → Multi-instrumentalist bluegrass musician as a member of folk-pop The Tarriers (“The Banana Boat Song,” #4, 1956) in the 50s and as a sessionman in the 60s, recorded with Judy Collins, John Denver, Bob Dylan and others, famously arranged and played the banjo solo on a version of Arthur Smith‘s “Dueling Banjos” in the film Deliverance (1972) and on the follow-on single (#2, Country #5, 1973) in his own name, toured as a bandleader and recorded as a session player through the 00s, died in a nursing home from Alzheimer’s disease on 3/22/2020, age 80.
1940 ● Alix Dobkin / (Alix Cecil Dobkin) → Folk singer-songwriter and activist in the folk revival scene in New York’s Greenwich Village in the early 60s, issued her debut album, the groundbreaking Lavender Jane Loves Women, in 1973 describing a lesbian separatist utopia, later became the first American lesbian feminist musician to tour Europe, continued to tour and perform through the 00s, suffered a brain aneurysm in April 2021 and died following a stroke on 5/19/2021, age 80.
1942 ● Barbara George → One hit wonder New Orleans R&B singer with her self-penned crossover hit, “I Know (You Don’t Love Me No More)” (#3, 1961), died from a lung infection on 8/10/2006, age 63
1942 ● Squirrel Lester / (Robert Lester) → Tenor vocals for smooth R&B/Chicago soul The Chi-Lites, “Have You Seen Her?” (#3, 1971), died from liver cancer 1/21/2010, age 67
1945 ● Gary Loizzo → Guitar/vocals and founder, pop-rock one hit wonder American Breed, “Bend Me Shape Me” (Top 10, 1968)
1945 ● Kevin Ayers → Eccentric singer/songwriter and original bassist for Canterbury-scene psych-art-jazz-prog rock fusion Soft Machine, switched to guitar and solo in 1969, has issued more than a dozen albums over 40 years
1946 ● Snowy Fleet / (Gordon Fleet) → Drummer for Aussie-based 60s pop-rock The Easybeats, “Friday On My Mind” (#16, 1967)
1948 ● Barry Hay → Lead vocals and frontman for Dutch hard rock Golden Earring, “Radar Love” (#13, 1974), over 40 hits and 30 gold and platinum albums in the Netherlands
1949 ● Sputnik Spooner / (William Spooner) → Guitarist and founder of camp-rock pop-rock satirists The Tubes, “She’s A Beauty” (#10, 1978), solo
1949 ● Rock Action Asheton / (Scott Asheton) → Drummer for hard rock/proto-punk The Stooges, “I Wanna Be Your Dog” (1969), sessions, died from a heart attack on 3/15/2014, age 64
1953 ● J. T. Taylor / (James Taylor) → Lead singer for jazz-fusion then R&B/funk Kool & The Gang, “Celebration” (#1, 1981), left in 1988 for a largely unsuccessful solo career
1957 ● Tim Farriss → Guitarist for Aussie New Wave dance-groove-pop INXS, “Need You Tonight” (#1, 1987)
1958 ● Madonna / (Madonna Louise Victoria Ciccone) → Film actress, record producer, entrepreneur and dance-pop megastar, “Like A Virgin” (#1, 1984), best selling female rock artist of the 20th century and second (behind Barbra Streisand) top selling US female artist of all time
1960 ● Chris Pedersen → Drummer for eclectic alt rock pop-ska-punk-folk fusion Camper Van Beethoven, “Take The Skinheads Bowling” (1985)
1964 ● Matt Lukin → Bassist for grunge rock Mudhoney, “Suck You Dry” (Modern Rock #23, 1992)
1967 ● MC Remedee / (Debbie Pryce) → Vocals in female rap/house music duo Cookie Crew, “Rok Da House” (UK #5, 1988)
1972 ● Emily Burns Strayer / (Emily Burns Erwin Robison Strayer) → Multi-instrumentalist singer, songwriter and founding member of country-rock girl group Dixie Chicks, “Not Ready To Make Nice” (#4, 2006), formed Court Yard Hounds in 2010 with sister and former Dixie Chicks bandmate Martie Erwin Maguire
1980 ● Bob Hardy → Bassist for Scottish art-pop-rock Franz Ferdinand, “Take Me Out” (Alt Rock #3, 2004)
1980 ● Vanessa Lee Carlton → One hit wonder “new era” female pop-rock singer/songwriter, “A Thousand Miles” (#5, 2002)

August 17
1919 ● Georgia Gibbs / (Frieda Lipschitz) → Jazz-pop and R&B vocalist, first as a radio show singer and later as a widely popular 50s novelty pop artist, covered and bested LaVern Baker‘s “Tweedlee Dee” (#2, 1955), died of leukemia on 12/9/2006, age 87
1933 ● Mark Dinning / (Max Dinning) → One hit wonder pop singer, “Teen Angel” (#1, 1959), died from an alcoholism-related heart attack on 3/22/1986, age 52
1939 ● Ed Saunders → Poet, social activist, environmentalist and bandleader for 60s underground rock The Fugs, author of numerous books including The Family (1971) about Charles Manson and the Tate-LaBianca murders and a nine-volume collection America: A History In Verse (started in 1998)
1939 ● Luther Allison → Distinctive Chicago electric blues guitarist and songwriter with a remarkable career upsurge after signing with Alligator Records in 1994 and returning to the U.S. from France after a 20-year trip abroad, issued two Top 20 Blues albums before being diagnosed with a malignant lung tumor and dying a month later on 8/12/1997, age 57.
1942 ● Tommy West / (Thomas Picardo, Jr.) → Singer/songwriter, producer, member of 50s doo wop The Criterions (“I Remain Truly Yours,” 1959) and one half of the early 70s folk-pop duo Cashman & West (“American City Suite,” #27, 1972) with Dave Cashman, the two also co-wrote songs for The Partridge Family and produced three award-winning albums for Jim Croce plus the hits “Bad, Bad Leroy Brown (#1, 1972) and “Time In A bottle” (#1, 193), also worked with Mary Travers, Henry Gross and others, after splitting from the partnership moved to Nashville and wrote country music and produced albums for multiple artists, including several for singer Anne Murray, died of complications associated with Parkinson’s disease on 5/2/2021, age 78.
1944 ● The Chief Seiter / (John Seiter) → Drums and vocals for folk-sunshine-pop Spanky & Our Gang, “Someday Will Never Be The Same” (#9, 1967)
1944 ● Baby Huey / (James Ramey) → Corpulent rock and soul singer, songwriter and frontman for Baby Huey & The Babysitters whose lone album for Curtis Mayfield‘s Custom label, The Baby Huey Story: The Living Legend (1971) was released posthumously and is considered an early forerunner of hip hop music and a period classic, died from a weight and drug-induced heart attack on 10/28/1970, age 26
1946 ● Drake Levin / (Drake Levinshefski) → Lead guitar and backing vocals for hard-edged rock ‘n roll Paul Revere & The Raiders, “Just Like Me” (#11, 1965) and 14 other Top 30 hits, joined the band at age 16 for their prime hit-making years, left in 1967 in a dispute with bandleader Paul Revere (Dick) and formed power trio Brotherhood with two former Raiders, did session work and performed in Raiderss reunion tours until his death from cancer on 7/4/2009, age 62
1947 ● Gary Talley → Guitar for short-lived blue-eyed soul The Box Tops, “The Letter” (#1, 1967), then session work in Nashville, Memphis and Atlanta
1949 ● Sib Hashian / (John Hashian) → Drummer for 70s-80s arena rock Boston, “More Than A Feeling” (#5, 1976), after leaving the band sued leader Tom Scholz for back royalties and settled out of court
1950 ● Greg Arama → Bassist for Chicago-area garage rock The Gang, which became one hit wonder psych-rock Amboy Dukes, “Journey To The Center Of The Mind” (#16, 1968), died in a motorcycle accident on 9/18/1979, age 29.
1953 ● Kevin Rowland → Vocals for New Wave pop-rock Dexys Midnight Runners, “Come On Eileen” (#1, 1983), solo career after the band broke up in 1987, reformed in 2003
1955 ● Colin Moulding → Bassist for quirky New Wave synth-pop XTC, “Making Plans For Nigel” (UK #17, 1979) and side project for the band under the pseudonym The Dukes Of Stratosphear
1958 ● Belinda Carlisle → Co-founder and lead vocals for New Wave pop-punk girl group The Go-Go’s, “We Got The Beat”, (#2, 1982), the most successful all-female pop and rock band of all time and the only one to play their own instruments and write their own songs, started a solo career following The Go-Go’s breakup, “Heaven Is A Place On Earth” (#1, 1987), wrote autobiography Lips Unsealed (2010) which reached #27 on the New York Times bestseller list
1962 ● Gilby Clarke / (Gilbert Clarke) → Rhythm guitarist, replaced Izzy Stradlin in 1991 as lead guitar for hard rock Guns N’ Roses, “November Rain” (#3, 1992), left in 1994 for solo career and sessions with Slash’s Snakepit, Heart, MC5 and others
1964 ● Maria McKee → Co-founder and lead vocals for roots rock Lone Justice, “Shelter” (#47, Mainstream Rock #26, 1986), dissolved the band in favor of a solo career, “Show Me Heaven” (Adult Contemporary #28, UK #1, 1990) plus sessions
1965 ● Deen Castronovo → Journeyman rock drummer and session musician, worked with Bad English, Black Sabbath, Ozzy Osbourne, Social Distortion and many others before joining arena rock Journey as the band’s current drummer and backing vocalist (thru 2013).
1965 ● Steve Gorman → Drummer for roots/raunch rock The Black Crowes, “Hard To Handle” (Mainstream Rock #1, 1991)
1966 ● Jill Cunniff → Bassist and vocals for all-girl alt rock/hip hop Luscious Jackson, “Naked Eye” (#36, 1996)
1969 ● Donnie Wahlberg → Vocals for early 90s teen-pop boy band New Kids On The Block, “Step By Step” (#1, 1990), TV and film actor, brother of NKOTB bandmate and fellow actor Mark Wahlberg
1969 ● Posdnuos / (Kelvin Mercer) → MC and vocals for jazz rap and alt hip hop trio De La Soul, “Me Myself And I” (R&B #1, 1989)
1977 ● Claire Richards → Vocals and dance routines for pre-fab Brit dance-pop group The Steps, “5, 6, 7, 8” (UK #14, 1997)
1979 ● Mike Lewis → Guitarist for Welsh alt hard rock Lostprophets, “Last Train Home” (Mainstream Rock #10, 2004)

August 18
1918 ● Cisco Houston / (Gilbert Vandine Houston) → Traditional folk singer and guitarist, Woody Guthrie‘s traveling companion and harmony vocalist, died of cancer on 4/29/1961 shortly after career-boosting TV performances and appearance at the 1960 Newport Folk Festival, age 42
1925 ● Sonny Til / (Earlington Carl Tilghman) → Lead singer and frontman for doo wop and “bird group” trendsetting R&B vocal group The Orioles (“Crying In The Chapel,” #11, R&B #1, 1953), died of heart failure complicated by diabetes on 12/9/1981, age 56
1939 ● Maxine Brown → Underrated R&B/soul vocalist, “All In My Mind” (#19, 1960) and several other charting singles in the 60s
1939 ● Johnny Preston / (John Preston Courville) → Two hit wonder pop-rock singer discovered by J. P. “The Big Bopper” Richardson, “Running Bear” (#1, 1960) and “Cradle Of Love” (#7, 1960), died of heart failure on 3/4/2011, age 71
1944 ● Carl Wayne / (Colin David Tooley) → Founding member and lead singer for Brit psych-rock The Move, “Blackberry Way” (UK #1, 1968), left for a pop music, cabaret and TV theme song career, joined The Hollies in 2003, died of cancer on 8/31/2004, age 60
1945 ● Barbara Ann Harris → Singer for pop girl trio The Toys, “A Lover’s Concerto” (#2, 1965)
1945 ● Sara Dash → Founding member of 60s doo wop girl group The Bluebelles, which morphed into 70s disco-funk Labelle, (“Lady Marmalade,” #1, 1975 and several other mid-70s disco hits), went solo in 1976 and released four albums and another dance/pop hit, “Sinner Man” (#71, Dance/Club #9, 1978), later worked as a session singer for Laura Nyro, The Marshall Tucker Band, The Rolling Stones and others, toured in Keith Richards‘ band in the 90s but kept a low profile through the 10s, died from unexplained causes two days after a Labelle reunion live performance on 9/20/2021, age 76.
1945 ● Vince Melouney → Australian musician, original guitarist for pop-rock The Bee Gees (“I Started A Joke,” #6, 1968) and one of three official bandmembers who were not Gibb family members, left the band in 1968 to pursue other interests
1949 ● Nigel Griggs → Bassist for Aussie New Wave pop-rock Split Enz, “I Got You” (#53, UK #12, 1980)
1950 ● Dennis Elliott → Original drummer for Foreigner, “Double Vision” (#2, 1978), left in 1992 to pursue a career in wood sculpting
1951 ● John Rees → Bass and backing vocals for Scottish-Australian Men At Work, “Down Under” (#1, UK #1, 1983), their Grammy-winning debut album, Business As Usual, was simultaneously the #1 US and UK album in January 1983, gaining them the distinction of being the only Aussie band to hold all four top spots at once
1952 ● Patrick Swayze → TV and film actor, Dirty Dancing (1987) and Ghost (1990), one hit wonder pop singer, “She’s Like The Wind” (#3, 1987), died from pancreatic cancer on 9/14/2009, age 57
1953 ● Marvin Isley → Bass guitar for six-decade, multi-generation R&B/soul family group The Isley Brothers, “That Lady, Pts. 1-2” (#6, 1973), died from complications of diabetes on 6/6/2010, age 56
1956 ● Tony Garnier → Bass guitarist with Asleep At The Wheel and other bands, since 1989 toured and recorded in Bob Dylan‘s backing band as Dylan‘s longest-serving sideman, also recorded with Tom Waits, Paul Simon and Michelle Branch
1957 ● Ron Strykert → Co-founder, vocals and guitar for Scottish-Australian Men At Work, “Down Under” (#1, UK #1, 1983), their Grammy-winning debut album, Business As Usual, was simultaneously the #1 US and UK album in January 1983, gaining them the distinction of being the only Aussie band to hold all four top spots at once
1967 ● Blas Elias → Drummer in pop-glam metal Slaughter, “Fly To The Angels” (#19, 1990) and the Las Vegas production of Blue Man Group
1967 ● Dan Peters → Founding member and drummer for grunge rock Mudhoney, “Suck You Dry” (Modern Rock #23, 1992)
1967 ● Tracy Tracy / (Tracy Catell) → Peroxide-blonde lead vocals for indie pop-rockers The Primitives, “Crash” (Modern Rock #3, 1988)
1969 ● Everlast / (Erik Francis Schrody) → Irish-American rapper and singer-songwriter, founding member of one hit wonder hip hop trio House Of Pain, “Jump Around” (#3, Rap #5, 1992), left for blues-rock/hip hop solo career, “What It’s Like” (#13, Mainstream Rock #1, 1998), then hip hop supergroup La Coka Nostra
1971 ● Richard D. James → Influential acid/ambient electronic music composer and performer under the pseudonym Aphex Twin, “Windowlicker” (Dance #15, 1999)
1976 ● Dirk Lance / (George Alex Katunich) → Original bassist for alt-metal Incubus, “Drive” (#9, 2001), left in 2003 to pursue video game development, joined jam/funk Willie’s Nerve Clinic in 2006
1983 ● Mika / (Michael Penniman) → Lebanese-American pop singer and musician popular everywhere but North America, “Grace Kelly” (UK #1, 2007) and six other UK Top 20 singles

August 19
1935 ● Earl Gaines → Hard-luck soul-blues and electric blues singer, his top charting song, “It’s Love Baby (24 Hours A Day)” (R&B #2, 1955) was credited to the backing band Louis Brooks & The Hi-Toppers, two decades worth of follow-ups were less than successful, left the industry in the late 70s to work as a truck driver, returned in the 90s and recorded several further albums, died from cancer on 12/31/2009, age 74.
1939 ● Ginger Baker / (Peter Edward Baker) → One of the first superstar rock drummers, known equally for his jazz-influenced artistry as for his difficult personality, played in jazz ensembles in London during the 50s, joined early Brit blues-rock Blues Incorporated in 1962 and R&B/blues Graham Bond Organisation in 1963, co-founded blues-rock super-trio Cream (“Sunshine Of Your Love,” #5, 1968) and supergroup Blind Faith (US #1 album Blind Faith, 1969), went solo in 1970 and fronted jazz-rock fusion Ginger Baker’s Air Force for a brief period before dropping out of the mainstream to open a recording studio in Lagos, Nigeria, played with various other artists and in Cream spin-offs and reunions until his death from heart failure on 10/6/2019, age 80.
1940 ● Don Fardon / (Donald Arthur Maughn) → Lead singer for 60s Brit mod scene freakbeat The Sorrows (“Take A Heart,” UK #21, 1965), then one hit wonder pop singer with his cover of “(The Lament Of The Cherokee) Indian Reservation” (#20, 1968), continued to perform into the 00s
1940 ● Johnny Nash / (John Lester Nash, Jr.) → Texas-born soul-pop singer/songwriter with several minor hits in the early 60s and a chart-topper with the Jamaica-tinged, million-selling, self-penned “I Can See Clearly Now” (#1, 1972), a major component in the mainstreaming of reggae music in the US and Europe in the early 70s, which he nurtured through his record label, his music and his promotion of and production work for Bob Marley & The Wailers, Peter Tosh and others, largely dropped out of sight by the mid-80s and died from natural causes after a long period of declining health on 10/2/2020, age 80.
1940 ● Roger Cook → British pop music songwriter and performer, as Jonathan was one half the pop vocal duo David & Jonathan, “Michelle” (#18, Adult Contemporary #3, 1966), collaborated with Roger Greenaway (aka David) to pen dozens of pop-rock hit singles, including “Long Cool Woman In A Black Dress” (The Hollies, #2, 1972) and “I’d Like To Teach The World To Sing” (The New Seekers, #7, 1971)
1942 ● Bob Kuban → Drummer and frontman for St. Louis-based one hit wonder horn-rock Bob Kuban & The In-Men (“The Cheater,” #12, 1966), continues to perform with various incarnations the band into the 10s
1943 ● Billy J. Kramer / (William Howard Ashton) → Frontman for British Invasion pop-rock The Dakotas, “Little Children” (#7, 1964) and four other Top 40 singles in 1964
1943 ● Edwin Hawkins / (Edwin Reuben Hawkins) → Multiple Grammy-winning contemporary gospel and R&B singer, composer, keyboardist and leader of the gospel-pop Edwin Hawkins Singers, best known for the catchy, unplanned worldwide hit “Oh Happy Day” (#4, R&B #2, CAN #2, UK #2, 1969) but racked up 19 other Grammy gospel nominations and three other wins over a 30-year music career, inducted into the Christian Music Hall of Fame in 2007, died from pancreatic cancer on 1/15/2018, age 74
1945 ● Ian Gillan → Heavy metal vocalist, joined hard rock/prog rock Deep Purple, “Smoke On The Water” (#4, 1973) in 1969 but left in 1973, sang lead on the Jesus Christ Superstar (1971) concept album and Broadway show soundtrack, solo and frontman for the Ian Gillan Band and Gillan, joined Black Sabbath in 1984, reunited with Deep Purple in late-1984
1947 ● George Newsome → Drums and vocals for Brit blues-rock Climax Blues Band, “Couldn’t Get It Right” (#3, 1977)
1948 ● Elliott Lurie → Co-founder, guitarist and singer/songwriter for one hit wonder pop-rock Looking Glass, “Brandy (You’re A Fine Girl)” (#1, 1972), now a movie music composer and arranger
1948 ● Susan Jacks / (Susan Elizabeth Pesklevits) → Canadian teenaged folk-pop singer on 60s national TV music variety shows, formed psych-pop quartet The Poppy Family in 1967 with then-husband Terry Jacks (“Seasons In The Sun,” Worldwide #1, 1974) and gained stardom with five Canada Top 10 hits, including “Which Way You Goin’, Billy?” (#2, CAN #1, 1969), divorced Jacks in 1973 and left the group for a successful solo and songwriting career, scoring ten Canada Top 10 Adult Contemporary singles and garnering numerous Juno nominations, discontinued performing except to raise donations for kidney charities after having a kidney transplant in 2005, died from renal-disease infections on 4/25/2022, age 73.
1951 ● John Deacon → Bassist and songwriter for camp rock/mock-opera/hard pop Queen, “Bohemian Rhapsody” (#9, 1976), wrote or co-wrote “Stone Cold Crazy,” “You’re My Best Fiend,” “Another One Bites The Dust” (#1, 1980) and others, retired from the music business in the 90s
1963 ● Joey Tempest / (Joakim Larsson) → Vocals for Swedish hard rock/glam-metal Europe, “The Final Countdown” (#8, 1986)
1966 ● Lee Ann Womack → Grammy-winning traditional country and pop crossover singer/songwriter, “I Hope You Dance” (#14, Country #1, 2000), actress
1970 ● Fat Joe / (Joseph Cartagena) → Hip hop entertainer and entrepreneur, East Coast/gangsta/Latino rapper, “What’s Luv” (#2, 2002), founder and CEO of hip hop record label Terror Squad Entertainment
1970 ● MC Eric / (Eric Martin) → Vocals for Belgian studio-based electro-dance-pop “house” music Technotronic, “Pump Up The Jam” (#2, 1989), solo, producer, teacher
1976 ● Régine Chassagne → Singer, multi-instrumentalist musician and co-founding member, with her husband Win Butler, of Grammy-winning Canadian alt/indie rock Arcade Fire, “Keep The Car Running” (Alt #32, 2007)
1980 ● Darius Campbell-Danesh → Scottish stage actor, UK TV Popstars contestant in 2001 and folk-pop singer, “Colourblind” (UK #1, 2002)
1983 ● Missy Higgins / (Melissa Higgins) → Australian pop singer/songwriter and guitarist, “Where I Stood” (Adult Top 40 #6, Aussie #10, 2006)
1989 ● Lil’ Romeo / (Percy Miller, Jr.) → Pre-teen rapper, “My Baby” (#3, Rap #1, 2001), actor and host of his own Nickelodeon TV show Romeo, son of hardcore rapper Master P (Percy Miller)

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