This Week’s Birthdays (June 13 – 19)

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Bobby Freeman

Happy Birthday this week to:

June 13
1913 ● Ben Raleigh → Prolific pop lyricist, wrote “Tell Laura I Love Her” for Ray Peterson (#7, 1960) and the theme song “Scooby Doo, Where Are You?” to the Hanna-Barbera cartoon show, died in a home fire on 2/26/1997, age 83
1934 ● Uriel Jones → Drummer in Motown house band The Funk Brothers, which provided nearly all instrumentation behind every Motown hit, died from a heart attack on 3/24/2009, age 74
1940 ● Bobby Freeman / (Robert Thomas Freeman) → Dance craze R&B/soul-pop singer and songwriter who wrote and recorded the enduring hit, “Do You Want To Dance” (#5, 1958) while still a teenager, the song has been covered in multiple variations by The Beach Boys, John Lennon, The Ramones, Bette Midler and others, died following a heart attack on 1/23/2017, age 76
1941 ● Marv Tarplin / (Marvin Tarplin) → Session guitarist and songwriter for Motown Records, collaborated with Smokey Robinson, co-wrote and played on many R&B hits, including “Tracks Of My Tears” (#16, R&B #2, 1965) for The Miracles, left Motown in 1973 to work with Robinson in his solo career for the next 35 years, died from unspecified causes on 9/30/2011 , age 70
1942 ● James Carr → Underappreciated R&B/Southern soul singer, “Dark End Of The Street” (#77, R&B #10, 1967), died of lung cancer on 1/17/2001, age 58
1943 ● Esther Ofarim → One half of Israeli folk-pop-rock vocal duo Esther & Abi, “Cinderella Rockafeller” (UK #1, 1968)
1943 ● Dyke Christian / (Arlester Christian) → Bassist, singer and frontman for 60s R&B/funk Dyke And The Blazers, the early backing band for The O’Jays, wrote “Funky Broadway” for Wilson Pickett (#8, Soul #1, 1967), had several minor hits with his band until he was shot to death on a Phoenix, AZ street on 3/13/1971, age 27
1946 ● Paul Buckmaster / (Paul John Buckmaster) → Composer, conductor and arranger best known for a nearly 50 year career creating the orchestral arrangements to well-known pop, rock, jazz and country hits by multiple artists, including David Bowie‘s “Space Oddity” (#124, UK #5, 1969), Elton John‘s “Your Song” (#8, UK #7, 1970), Carly Simon‘s “You’re So Vain” (#1, UK #1, 1972) ), plus albums by Grateful Dead (Terrapin Station, 1977), Counting Crows (Recovering The Satellites, 1996), Guns ‘N Roses (Chinese Democracy, 2008), Heart (Beautiful Broken, 2016) and many others, died from undisclosed causes on 11/7/2017, age 71
1947 ● John Kahn → Bass guitarist and session musician in the 60s and 70s for Mike Bloomfield, Brewer & Shipley, Maria Muldaur and others, best known for his 25 year collaboration with the Grateful Dead‘s Jerry Garcia in multiple projects, including The Jerry Garcia Band, bluegrass Old & In The Way, acoustic duo Garcia & Kahn plus other efforts with Merle Saunders and Howard Wales, died in his sleep on 5/30/1996, age 48
1949 ● Dennis Locorriere → Guitarist for AM pop-rock Dr. Hook & The Medicine Show, “Sylvia’s Mother” (#5, 1972) plus nine other Top 40 hits
1951 ● Howard Leese → Guitar and keyboards for hard rock Heart, “These Dreams” (#1, 1986)
1951 ● Jorge Santana / (Guillermo Jorge Santana) → Guitarist, bandleader and younger brother of Latin rock superstar Carlos Santana, joined R&B/horn-rock Malibus in the late 60s and helped transform the band into influential, smooth Chicano rock Malo (“Suavecito,” #18, AC #8, 1972), went solo in 1976 and issued five albums in his name over 35 years, plus one with Latin rock supergroup Fania All-Stars, one as a sideman to his brother, and one in full collaboration (Santana Brothers, 1994), continued to tour with Malo on the oldies circuit until dying from natural causes on 5/14/2020, age 68.
1954 ● Bo Donaldson / (Robert Donaldson) → Pop-rock singer, keyboardist, trumpeter and frontman for The Heywoods, “Billy Don’t Be a Hero” (#1, 1974)
1957 ● Rolf Brendel → Drummer for German pop-rock band Nena, “99 Luftballons” (#2, 1984)
1963 ● Paul DeLisle → Bassist for neo-garage/quirky Smash Mouth, “Walkin’ On The Sun” (Adult Top 40 #1, 1997)
1963 ● Robbie Merrill → Bassist for hard rock Godsmack, “Straight Out Of Line” (Mainstream #1, 2003)
1968 ● David Gray → Brit singer/songwriter and guitarist, “Babylon” (Adult Top 40 #8, 2000)
1968 ● Deneice Pearson → Vocals for Brit family R&B/dance-pop quintet 5 Star, “Can’t Wait Another Minute” (#41, Dance/Club #7, 1986) and fifteen Top 40 singles in native England
1969 ● Søren Rasted → Co-founder, keyboards and drum machine for Danish dance-pop Aqua, “Barbie Girl” (#7, 1997), which drew a lawsuit from Mattel for its sexual content, solo, producer, actor
1970 ● Rivers Cuomo → Singer, songwriter, guitarist and leader for post-grunge alt rock Weezer, “Beverly Hills” (#10, 2005)
1978 ● J Brown / (Jason Paul Brown) → Vocals for pre-fabricated hip hop dance-pop boy band quintet Five, “When The Lights Go Out” (#10, UK #4, 1998)
1981 ● Kymberley Marsh → Singer for pre-fab mockstar dance-pop Hear’Say, “Pure And Simple” (UK #1, 2001), quit the group in 2002 to pursue an acting career
1985 ● Raz-B / (De’Mario Monte Thornton) → Vocals for R&B/hip hop urban boy band B2K, “Bump, Bump, Bump” (#1, 2002)

June 14
1909 ● Burl Ives → Grammy-winning, grandfatherly folk singer, “A Little Bitty Tear” (#9, 1962), stage and screen actor, writer, radio personality, died from mouth cancer on 4/14/1995, age 85
1929 ● Cy Coleman / (Seymour Kaufman) → Child-prodigy classical pianist turned jazz-pop artist and Tony Award-winning composer for Broadway and films, wrote music for multiple stage hits, including “If My Friends Could See Me Now” and “Big Spender” for Sweet Charity (1966), and the latter for Shirley Bassey (UK #21, 1967), scored music for the films Father Goose (1964), Power (1986) and others, periodically recorded solo albums and charted a lone hit, “Chloe” (Disco #8, 1975), died from a heart attack on 11/18/2004, age 75
1931 ● Junior Walker / (Autry DeWalt Mixon, Jr.) → Saxophonist and founder/frontman for R&/pop-soul Jr. Walker & The All Stars, “Shotgun” (#4, 1965), solo and sessions, died of cancer on 11/23/1995, age 64.
1936 ● Obie Benson / (Renaldo Benson) → Original member and vocals for 50s high school R&B/soul vocal quartet that became hugely successful The Four Tops, “Reach Out (I’ll Be There)” (#1, 1966), co-wrote the anti-war Marvin Gaye hit “What’s Goin’ On” (#2, 1971), died of lung cancer on 7/1/2005, age 69.
1937 ● Chuck Berghofer / (Charles Curtis Berghofer) → Jazz and pop bassist, as a member of several 60s jazz ensembles played with Jack Shelton, Rahsaan Roland Kirk and other luminaries, member of the acclaimed Wrecking Crew group of L.A. studio musicians, played the bass solo on Nancy Sinatra‘s “These Boots Are Made For Walkin'” (#1, 1966), appeared on numerous film soundtracks, recently worked with Christine Aguilera, Michael Feinstein and others
1938 ● Julie Felix / (Julie Ann Felix) → American-born folk singer who relocated to London and became, for a time, “Britain’s first lady of folk,” a successful performer, TV personality, fixture on the London hippie/folk scene and the first solo folk artist signed to a major British record label (Decca, 1964), issued 22 solo albums and several charting singles (“If I Could (El Cóndor Pasa),” UK #19, 1970), appeared regularly on BBC television with the satirist David Frost before hosting her own show, Once More with Felix, on BBC Two from 1967 to 1970, performed at the first Isle Of Wight Festival (1969), released her final album in 2018 and performed at festivals until just prior to her death following a brief illness on 3/22/2020, age 81.
1943 ● Spooner Oldham / (Dewey Lindon Oldham) → Keyboardist, songwriter and session musician, worked at FAME and Muscle Shoals Studios in Alabama and appears on hundreds of songs and albums, including hits by Aretha Franklin, Wilson Pickett, Percy Sledge and countless others, co-wrote “Cry Like A Baby” for The Box Tops (#2, 1968), moved to Los Angeles in the 80s and continues to record and tour with artists including Neil Young and Drive-By Truckers
1945 ● Rod Argent → Founding member, songwriter and keyboardist for underappreciated art-pop rock The Zombies, “Time Of The Season” (#3, 1969), frontman for hard/art rock Argent, “Hold Your Head Up” (#5, 1972), now a TV and film composer
1947 ● The Fish / (Barry Melton) → Co-founder and original guitarist for psych-country-protest-rock Country Joe & The Fish, “I Feel Like I’m Fixin’ to Die Rag” (1967), later co-founded San Francisco neo-psych-rock supergroup The Dinosaurs, retired public defender in California
1949 ● Alan White → Drummer for Plastic Ono Band and John Lennon, “Instant Karma!” (#3, 1970), played with George Harrison and joined Ginger Baker’s Air Force, replaced Bill Bruford in 1972 in archetypal, pioneer progressive rock band Yes, “Owner Of A Lonely Heart” (#1, 1983) and has played on every Yes album since
1949 ● Jim Lea → Bass, piano, violin, vocals and songwriting for Brit glam-metal Slade, “Run Runaway” (#20, 1984)
1958 ● Nick Van Ede → Vocals for New Wave pop-rock Cutting Crew, wrote “(I Just) Died In Your Arms Tonight” (#1, 1987)
1961 ● Boy George / (George O’Dowd) → Androgynous frontman and lead singer for New Wave pop-rock Culture Club, “Karma Chameleon” (#1, 1984), solo, “The Crying Game” (#15, 1993)
1963 ● Chris DeGarmo → Guitarist for progressive pop-metal Queensrÿche, “Silent Lucidity” (#9, 1991)
1966 ● Matt Freeman → Bassist in punk rock revival Rancid, “Time Bomb” (Modern Rock #8, 1995)
1969 ● MC Ren / (Lorenzo Patterson) → Member of controversial/influential gangsta rap quintet N.W.A., “Express Yourself” (Hot Dance #38, 1989), solo, “Same Old Shit” (Rap #11, 1993)
1970 ● Chris Chaney → Bassist for alt rock/post-punk Jane’s Addiction, “Been Caught Stealing” (Mainstream Rock #29, 1990)
1971 ● Billie Myers → Pop, jazz and world music singer/songwriter, “Kiss The Rain” (#15, 1998)
1983 ● Siobhan Donaghy → Vocals in Brit multi-racial pop girl group Sugababes, “Hole In The Head” (Dance/Club #1, 2004)

June 15
1910 ● David Rose → Emmy-winning composer, pianist and orchestra leader whose best known compositions include the jazzy instrumental “The Stripper” (#1, 1962), wrote film scores for Hollywood and many TV shows, including Bonanza and Little House On The Prairie, led the house band for The Red Skelton Show for 21 years, died of natural causes on 8/23/1990, age 80
1921 ● Errol Garner → Virtuoso jazz and swing pianist, wrote the jazz standard, oft-covered and Grammy Hall of Fame song “Misty” (1954) and issued multiple jazz and jazz-pop albums, died of lung cancer on 1/2/1977, age 55.
1929 ● Nigel Pickering → Founding member, songwriter, rhythm guitarist and vocals for sunny folk-pop Spanky & Our Gang, “Sunday Will Never Be The Same” (#9, 1967), died from liver cancer on 5/5/2011, age 81
1931 ● Russ Gibb / (Russell James Gibb) → Disc jockey, music venue owner and local rock ‘n’ roll impresario at the center of the 60s Detroit music scene, early supporter of local bands MC5, Ted Nugent and Iggy Pop, best known for starting and perpetuating the 1969 “Paul is dead” hoax about Beatle Paul McCartney‘s supposed death and subsequent cover-up, later invested in music magazine Creem and regional cable TV franchises, died from undisclosed causes on 4/30/2019, age 87.
1937 ● Waylon Jennings → Grammy-winning “outlaw” country guitarist, singer and songwriter, started in the Buddy Holly Band, solo, “Mamas Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up To Be Cowboys” (#42, Country #1, 1978), formed mythic country supergroup The Highwaymen, “Highwayman” (Country #1, 1985), died from complications of diabetes on 2/13/2002, age 64
1940 ● Peggy Sue Gerron Rackham → Then-girlfriend (and future wife) of drummer Jerry Allison of 50s pop-rock Buddy Holly & The Crickets who lent her name to the band’s hit song “Peggy Sue” (#3, 1957) and recounted her story in the autobiography, “Whatever Happened to Peggy Sue?” (2008), died from undisclosed causes on 10/1/2018, age 78.
1941 ● Harry Nilsson / (Harry E. Nilsson, III) → Grammy-winning folk-pop singer, songwriter and guitarist, “Everybody’s Talkin” (#6, 1969) from the movie Midnight Cowboy, and “Without You” (#1, 1972), died of heart failure on 1/15/1994, age 52
1943 ● Muff Winwood / (Mervyn Winwood) → Bassist for Brit pop-rock Spencer Davis Group, “Gimme Some Lovin”” (#7, 1967), producer, record executive, older brother of Steve Winwood
1943 ● Johnny Hallyday / (Jean-Phillipe Smet) → The “Elvis Presley of France” and one of the most successful pop music artists of all time, sold over 110 million albums over 50+ years in the French speaking world but with little attention everywhere else, recorded more than three dozen French Top 10 hits, including “Viens Danser Le Twist” (FR #1, 1961), a cover of Chubby Checker‘s “Let’s Twist Again” (#8, UK #7, 1961) and “Mon Plus Beau Noel” (FR #1, 2005), at varying times Jimmy Page, Peter Frampton and Foreigner‘s Mick Jones played on his records, died from lung cancer on 12/6/2017, age 74
1944 ● Eddie Hinton → Songwriter, session guitarist and member of the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section (also known as The Swampers), the renowned studio musician ensemble that recorded hundreds of songs and albums at Muscle Shoals Studio in Alabama, including hits by Aretha Franklin, The Staple Singers, Paul Simon, Lynyrd Skynyrd and countless others, wrote the Dusty Springfield hit “Breakfast in Bed” (#91, 1969) and other songs, died from a heart attack on 7/28/1995, age 51
1946 ● Demis Roussos / (Artemios Roussos) → Operatic-voiced Greek singer and bassist with prog-rock Aphrodite’s Child, solo, “L.O.V.E. Got A Hold On Me” (Dance/Club #26, 1978)
1946 ● Janet Lennon → With her sisters, vocals in semi-religious pop vocal quartet The Lennon Sisters (“Tonight You Belong To Me,” #15, 1956), performed regularly on TV variety shows, including The Lawrence Welk Show from 1955 to 1968, continues to record and perform as a trio in the 10s
1946 ● Leo Nocentelli → Guitarist in New Orleans soul-funk The Meters, “Chicken Strut” (1970), backing guitarist for Robert Palmer, Dr. John and others, continues to perform with the band and as solo artist through the 10s
1946 ● Noddy Holder / (Neville Holder) → Guitar and vocals for Brit glam-metal Slade, “Run Runaway” (#20, 1984), TV actor, radio and TV presenter
1949 ● Michael Lutz → Guitarist for Detroit rock ‘n’ roll band Brownsville Station, “Smokin’ In The Boys Room” (#3, 1973)
1949 ● Russell Hitchcock → Vocals for Aussie light pop-rock Air Supply, “The One That You Love” (#1, 1981)
1949 ● Meri Wilson (Edgmon) / (Meri Wilson Edgmon) → Model, sometime actress and one hit wonder singer/songwriter known for her double entendre smash “Telephone Man” (#18, UK #6, 1977), recorded one album of additional novelty-pop songs with mixed reviews and returned to singing jingles and modeling, died in a one car accident on an icy Georgia road on 12/28/2002, age 53
1951 ● Steve Walsh → Co-lead singer and keyboardist for prog/heartland rock Kansas, “Carry On Wayward Son” (#11, 1977), then Streets
1954 ● Terri Gibbs / (Teresa Fay Gibbs) → Blind-from-birth child prodigy keyboardist and country-pop-gospel singer, “Somebody’s Knockin'” (#13, Country #8, 1980)
1956 ● Bernie Shaw → Canadian vocalist for Brit hard/prog rock Spice, renamed Uriah Heep, “Easy Livin'” (#39, 1972)
1956 ● David Hinds → Rhythm guitar and lead vocals for roots reggae Steel Pulse, “Prodigal Son” (UK #35, 1978)
1957 ● Brad Gillis → Guitarist in one hit wonder pop-rock Rubicon, “I’m Gonna Take Care Of Everything” (#28, 1978), then Night Ranger, “Sister Christian” (#5, 1984) and Ozzy Osbourne‘s band
1958 ● Neil Arthur → Singer for New Wave synth-pop duo Blancmange, “Don’t Tell Me” (UK #8, 1984)
1963 ● Scott Rockenfield → Drummer for progressive pop-metal Queensrÿche, “Silent Lucidity” (#9, 1991)
1966 ● Michael Britt → Lead guitar and backing vocals for cross-over country-rockers Lonestar, “Amazed” (#1, 1999)
1966 ● Rob Mitchell → Principal songwriter and lead guitarist for Christian pop-rock Sixpence None The Richer, “Kiss Me” (#2, 1998)
1969 ● Ice Cube / (O’Shea Jackson) → Founding member of controversial/influential gangsta rap quintet N.W.A., “Express Yourself” (Hot Dance #38, 1989), solo rapper, “Check Yo Self” (#20, Rap #1, 1993)
1970 ● Chi Cheng → Chinese-American bassist for Grammy-winning alt heavy metal Deftones, “Change (In The House Of Flies)” (Mainstream Rock #9, 2000)
1976 ● Dryden Vera Mitchell → Vocals for alt rock Alien Ant Farm, “Smooth Criminal” (#23, 2001)
1976 ● Gary Lightbody → Guitar and vocals for Irish alt rock Snow Patrol, “Chasing Cars” (#5, 2006)
1981 ● Billy Martin → Guitar and keyboards for post-grunge punk-pop Good Charlotte, “The Anthem” (Alt Rock #10, 2003)
1985 ● Nadine Coyle → Singer in pre-fab all-girl Euro-pop vocal group Girls Aloud, “Sound Of The Underground” (UK #1, 2002)

June 16
1934 ● Carl “Little Caesar” Burnett / (Carl Burnett) → Frontman and lead vocals for L.A.-based doo wop Little Caesar & The Romans and their one hit wonder single “Those Oldies But Goodies (Remind Me Of You)” (#9, 1961), one of the last doo wop era hits
1939 ● Crash Craddock / (Billy Wayne Craddock) → 50s teen-pop turned country-pop singer, “Rub It In” (#16, Country #1, 1974) and 18 other Country Top 20 singles in the 70s
1941 ● Lamont DozierMotown Records‘ musical arranger and producer with the Holland-Dozier-Holland songwriting team, co-wrote many hits for The Supremes, The Four Tops, Martha & The Vandellas, The Isley Brothers and others.
1942 ● Edward Levert → Vocals for R&B/Philly soul giants The O’Jays, “Love Train” (#1, 1973)
1942 ● John Rostill → Composer and bassist, early career in backing bands for touring artists including The Everly Brothers and Tommy Roe plus a stint in the Zoot Money Quartet (with future Police guitarist Andy Summers), joined instrumental pop-rock The Shadows (“Foot Tapper,” UK #1, 1963) in the early 60s, wrote or co-wrote a number of hits for The Shadows and other artists, including “Let Me Be There” for Olivia Newton-John (#6, 1973), died from electrocution in his home recording studio on 11/26/1973, age 31
1943 ● Barbara Martin / (Barbara Diane Martin Richardson) → Original member of The Supremes in 1960-1962, sang background vocals and an occasional second lead next to Diana Ross in the group’s formative days, including on many tracks on their debut album, Meet The Supremes (1962) but is not pictured with Ross, Florence Ballard and Mary Wilson on the cover as she left the group in early 1962 for a pregnancy, later earned a degree in psychology and started a career in mental health services, died from undisclosed causes on 3/4/2020, age 76.
1945 ● Ivan Lins → Latin Grammy-winning Brazilian jazz-pop vocalist with a 40-year recording history and multiple covers of his compositions by a diverse and growing group of artists, including Elle Fitzgerald, Sting, Dave Grusin, Michael Bublé and many others
1945 ● Rudolph Damiani → Founding member and drummer for 60s Boston-based garage rock The Remains (“Don’t Look Back,” 1966), the band received critical acclaim, appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show and Hullabaloo, and opened for The Beatless’ 1966 tour but gained little commercial success and disbanded in 1966, died of a cerebral hemorrhage on 2/23/2014, age 68
1946 ● Ian Matthews / (Iain Matthew McDonald) → Irish guitarist and songwriter with renowned Brit folk-rock Fairport Convention, “Si Tu Dos Partir” (UK #21, 1969), formed light pop-folk-rock Southern Comfort, “Woodstock” (#23, 1970), solo, “Shake It” (#13, 1979)
1949 ● Peppy Castro / (Emil Thielheim) → Guitar and vocals for early psychedelic rock Blues Magoos, “(We Ain’t Got) Nothin’ Yet” (#5, 1967), later formed pop-rock Balance, “Breaking Away” (#22, 1981)
1950 ● James Smith → Vocals for R&B/Philly soul The Stylistics, “You Make Me Feel Brand New” (#2, 1974) plus 15 R&B Top 40 singles
1952 ● Gino Vannelli → Canadian soft rock singer/songwriter, “People Gotta Move” (#22, 1974) and “Living Inside Myself” (#6, 1981)
1953 ● Ian Mosley → Drummer for Brit prog-rock revival group Marillion, “Kayleigh” (Mainstream Rock #14, 1985)
1953 ● Malcolm Paul Mortimer → Drummer for Gentle Giant, Mick Jagger band, Ian Dury and others, session work
1954 ● Garry Roberts / (Garrick “Garry” Roberts) → Guitarist for Irish pop-punk Boomtown Rats, “I Don’t Like Mondays” (#73, 1979) and “Rat Trap” (UK #1, 1979), the first rock song by an Irish band to reach #1 in the UK
1958 ● Patrick Waite → With brother Junior, bass guitar and vocals for ska/reggae band Musical Youth, “Pass The Dutchie” (#10, 1982), died from hereditary heart failure while in police custody for drug charges on 2/13/1993, age 34
1971 ● 2Pac / (Lesane Parish Crooks) → Dancer and rapper for Digital Underground, then solo gangsta rapper, “California Love” (#31, 1996), died following a drive-by shooting on the Las Vegas strip on 9/13/1996, age 25
1987 ● Diana DeGarmoAmerican Idol runner-up, Broadway actress, solo teen-pop singer, “Dreams” (#14, 2004)

June 17
1902 ● Sammy Fain / (Samuel E. Feinberg) → Broadway show songwriter and film score composer, penned the music for endearing popular songs, including “I Can Dream, Can’t I?” (1937) and “Tender Is The Night” (1962), won Oscars for “Secret Love” (1953) and “Love Is A Many Splendored Thing” (1955), scored film soundtracks for Alice In Wonderland (1951), Peter Pan (1953), April Love (1957) and the Broadway shows Hellzapoppin’ (1938), Christine (1960) and others, died from a heart attack on 12/6/1989, age 87
1910 ● Red Foley / (Clyde Julian Foley) → Pioneer country-pop crossover star in the post-WWII era with 56 Country Top 10 hits and 13 Pop Top 40 hits from 1944 to 1956, including “Chattanooga Shoe Shine Boy” (#1, Country #1, 1950), continued to record and perform until his death from a heart attack after a show in Indiana on 9/19/1968, age 58
1916 ● Terry Gilkyson / (Hamilton H. Gilkyson III) → Folk-pop singer and songwriter, wrote “The Cry Of The Wild Goose” (#1, 1950) for Frankie Lane and songs used by other artists, sang with The Weavers on “On Top Of Old Smokey” (#2, 1953), formed influential but unheralded folk trio The Easy Riders in the mid-50s and co-wrote their big hit, the oft-covered “Marianne” (#3, 1957), wrote songs that were used in Disney films, died from complications of an aneurysm on 10/15/1999 , age 83
1918 ● Billy Garland / (William Jefferson Garland) → Blues guitarist, singer and songwriter in the 40s, “Got Nothing On Me” (1945), died in a car accident on 3/16/1960, age 41
1930 ● Cliff Gallup → Guitarist for rockabilly Gene Vincent And His Blue Caps, “Be-Bop-A-Lula” (#7, 1956), died of a heart attack on 10/9/1988, age 58
1937 ● Edward Farran → With his identical twin brother, Fred and brothers Tom and Scott Herrick, singer in pop cover quartet The Arbors (“The Letter,” #20, 1969), coached rock and pop singers with voice lessons and wrote and sang commercial jingles for three decades thereafter, died of kidney failure on 1/2/2003, age 65
1937 ● Fred Farran → With his identical twin brother, Ed and brothers Tom and Scott Herrick, singer in pop cover quartet The Arbors (“The Letter,” #20, 1969), stayed as a group after their fame ran out and wrote and recorded commercial jingles for three decades thereafter, died of pneumonia on 8/29/2011, age 74
1939 ● Dave Alldred → Drummer in 50s Tex-Mex rockabilly The Rhythm Orchids with Buddy Knox, “Party Doll” (#1, 1957), co-wrote “Click Clack” (#28, 1958) and performed the song and others in the pop band Dickey Doo & The Don’ts, continued to perform in the 90s
1940 ● Chuck Rainey → Bass guitarist for multiple rock, soul, funk, jazz and fusion acts over five decades, on scores of albums and in touring bands, including King Curtis (“Memphis Soul Stew,” #33, 1967), five albums by Steely Dan, the Montreux Jazz Festival in 1971 with Eddie Vinson, and seven albums as a bandleader, the latest in 2013 (Interpretations of a Groove).
1942 ● Norman Kuhlke → Drummer for British Invasion pop-rock The Swinging Blue Jeans, “Hippy Hippy Shake” (#21, 1964)
1943 ● Barry Manilow / (Barry Alan Pincus) → Highly successful adult contemporary/MOR singer, “I Write The Songs” (#1, 1976), songwriter, producer, conductor and stage performer
1944 ● Chris Spedding / (Peter Robinson) → Brit rock and jazz guitarist with several solo albums and a lone single, “Motorbikin'” (UK Top 20, 1975), but mainly known for sessions and touring with Harry Nilsson, John Cale, Roxy Music, Elton John and others, Greedy Bastards
1947 ● Gregg Rolie → Keyboardist and founding member of Latin-rock Santana, “Black Magic Woman” (#4, 1970) , then original lead singing for arena rock Journey, “Who’s Crying Now” (#4, 1981), currently frontman for the Gregg Rolie Band
1947 ● Paul Young → Singer and percussionist for Brit soft pop-rock Sad Café, “Every Day Hurts” (UK #3, 1979), then pop-rock Mike + The Mechanics, “All I Need Is A Miracle” (#5, 1986), died of a heart attack on 7/15/2000, age 53
1949 ● Russell Smith / (Howard Russell Smith) → Founding member, lead singer, guitarist and songwriter for Grammy-winning country-rock Amazing Rhythm Aces (“Third Rate Romance,” #14, Country #11, CAN #1, 1975), left the group in 1985 for a career as a solo artist with five albums mixing country, Southern rock, blues and bluegrass (“I Wonder What She’s Doing Tonight,” Country #37, 1989), his songwriting oeuvre contains four County #1 hits recorded by others, including “Look Heart, No Hands” (1993) for Randy Travis, formed novelty bluegrass Run C&W with erstwhile Eagle Bernie Leadon in the mid-90s before restarting ARA and performing until dying from cancer on 7/12/2019, age 70.
1951 ● Lenny LeBlanc → Guitarist, session musician, songwriter and one half of the light pop-rock duo LeBlanc & Carr (“Falling,” #13, 1977), as part of the Muscle Shoals Studios (Alabama) house band recorded with numerous top artists, including The Supremes, Ricky Scaggs, Roy Orbison, Amy Grant and others, switched to Christian music in the 80s and continues to record and produce music
1957 ● Philip Chevron → Guitarist for Irish folk-punk-rock The Pogues, “Tuesday Morning” (Rock #11, 1993)
1958 ● Jello Biafra / (Eric Boucher) → Lead singer and songwriter for controversial hard core punk rock Dead Kennedys, “Too Drunk To F**k” (UK #31, 1980), leading figure of the Green Party in the US
1960 ● Michael Monroe / (Matti Fagerholm) → Vocals for Finnish glam-punk-metal Hanoi Rocks, “Up Around The Bend” (1984)
1965 ● Richard Hynd → Drummer for Scottish blues-rock Texas, “In My Heart” (Alt Rock #14, 1991)
1969 ● Kevin Thornton → Vocals in a cappella hip hop harmony group Color Me Badd, “I Wanna Sex You Up” (#2, 1991)
1972 ● Rikrok / (Ricardo George Ducent) → London-born, Jamaican descent reggae singer and songwriter, “It Wasn’t Me” (#1, 2000)
1981 ● Ben Kweiler → Former teenage frontman for 90s post-grunge Radish, then solo, “Wasted & Ready” (Modern Rock #29, 2002) and two acclaimed Indie Top 10 albums, Ben Kweiler (#1, 2006 and Changing Horses (#8, 2009)
1983 ● Lee Ryan → Vocals in Brit R&B/soul-dance boy band Blue, “Too Close” (UK #1, 2001)
1987 ● Kendrick Lamar Duckworth → Grammy-winning hip hop solo artist (“Swimming Pools (Drank),” #17, Rap #1, 2012) and member of West Coast rap collaborative supergroup Black Hippy
1989 ● Simone Battle / (Simone Sherise Battle) → Actress and singer, The X Factor finalist in 2011 and member of pop girl group G.R.L. (“Ugly Heart,” #107, UK #11, 2014), committed suicide by hanging on 9/5/2014, age 25

June 18
1913 ● Sammy Cahn / (Samuel Cohen) → LA-based musician, songwriter and Tin Pan Alley-style lyricist for romantic films and Broadway shows, wrote or co-wrote dozens of popular songs, including the enduring and oft-covered “Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!” (Vaughan Moore, #1, 1946), collaborated on multiple hits by Frank Sinatra, including “All The Way” (#1, 1957), died from congestive heart failure on 1/15/1993, age 79
1938 ● Sugarcane Harris / (Don Francis Bowman Harris) → Guitarist, pianist and half the 50s rock ‘n’ roll duo Don & Dewey, switched to electric violin and did session work for Little Richard, John Mayall, Frank Zappa and others, died from pulmonary disease on 11/30/1999, age 61
1942 ● Paul McCartney → The most successful rock composer of all time, with John Lennon co-wrote 21 US #1 and has over 30 US #1 singles as a solo artist and frontman for his band Wings
1942 ● Richard Perry → Highly successful and popular record producer with twelve gold discs, label owner (Planet Records, 1978-83), worked with Captain Beefheart, The Pointer Sisters, Diana Ross, Leo Sayer, Carly Simon, Ringo Starr, Barbra Streisand and others
1942 ● Carl Radle → Bass guitarist for Derek & The Dominos, Eric Clapton band, Delaney & Bonnie, sessions for George Harrison, died of kidney failure on 5/30/1980, age 37
1944 ● Sandy Posey → Session vocalist for Elvis Presley, Percy Sledge (backing vocals on “When A Man Loves A Woman,” #1, 1966) and others, then pop singer, “Born A Woman” (#12, 1966) and three more Top 40 hits in the 60s, turned to countrypolitan pop in the 70s and scored six Country Top 40 hits, continued to record and perform into the 00s
1944 ● Rick Griffin / (Richard Alden Griffin) → Cartoonist, graphic artist and pioneering designer of psychedelic posters and album covers, including work for the Grateful Dead, the Fillmore West, Jimi Hendrix and others, frequent contributor to Zap Comix magazine, died in a motorcycle accident on 8/18/1991, age 47
1952 ● Ricky Gazda → Trumpets for New Jersey rock ‘n roll bar band Southside Johnny & The Asbury Jukes (“Talk To Me,” 1978) and later as a member of The Miami Horns, the touring and session recording horn section that backed Bruce Springsteen, Little Steven, Sheryl Crow and many others.
1953 ● Jerome Smith → Rhythm guitar for R&B/soul-disco-funk kings KC & The Sunshine Band, “That’s The Way (I Like It)” (#1, 1975) and five other #1 hits, died in a construction site accident on 7/28/2000, age 47
1961 ● Alison Moyet → Bluesy-voiced Brit pop-rock singer in synth-pop duo Yazoo, “Nobody’s Diary” (Dance/Club #1, 1983), solo, “Invisible” (#31, 1985)
1963 ● Dizzy Reed / (Darren Arthur Reed) → Keyboards for hard rock Guns N’ Roses, “Sweet Child O’ Mine” (#1, 1988)
1969 ● Sice / (Simon Rowbottom) → Guitarist and vocals for 90s Brit guitar-pop The Boo Radleys, “Barney (…And Me)” (Alt Rock #30, 1994)
1971 ● Nathan Morris → Baritone for R&B/urban soul a cappella Boyz II Men, “End Of The Road” (#1, 1992)
1973 ● Gary Stringer → Vocals for hard-edged Brit pop Reef, “Place Your Hands” (Mainstream Rock #29, 1997) from the UK #1 album Glow
1973 ● Ray LaMontagne → Folk, folk-rock and folk-blues singer, songwriter and guitarist with five studio LPs, including Gossip In The Grain (#3, 2008), and multiple singles (“Beg, Steal Or Borrow,” AAA #1, 2010)
1975 ● Sikk The Shocker / (Vyshonne King Miller) → Vocals for gangsta rap trio The Real Untouchables (TRU), “I Always Feel Like” (#71, Rap #11, 1997), solo, “It Ain’t My Fault” (#18, R&B #5, Rap #1, 1998)
1976 ● Blake Shelton → Country-pop crossover singer, songwriter and TV show star, “Austin” #18, Country #1, 2001) and 19 other Country #1 hits plus 13 other Pop Top 40 hits, judge of music competition shows Nashville Star, Clash Of The Choirs and The Voice

June 19
1902 ● Guy Lombardo / (Gaetano Alberto Lombardo) → Canadian-American easy listening violinist and bandleader, formed big band The Royal Canadians with three brothers and several other musicians in the 20s and became known for nearly 50 years of New Years Eve radio and then TV broadcasts, moonlighted as a hydroplane speedboat racer, won the Gold Cup and every other trophy in the field, died from a heart attack on 11/5/1977, age 75
1914 ● Lester Flatt → Legendary and musically prodigious bluegrass guitarist, cohort of Earl Scruggs in the Foggy Mountain Boys and in duo Flatt & Scruggs, died of heart failure on 5/11/1979, age 64
1925 ● Charlie Drake / (Charles Edward Spungall) → Brit comedian, children’s songwriter, TV actor and BBC program host, and (in the U.S.) one hit wonder novelty song singer, “My Boomerang Won’t Come Back” (#21, UK #14, 1962), died in his sleep on 12/23/2006, age 81
1928 ● Tommy DeVito / (Gaetano DeVito) → Founding member, guitarist and baritone vocals for 50s R&B vocal group The Variatones, which became The Four Lovers in 1956 and, from 1960, Top 40 pop vocal quartet The Four Seasons, “Big Girls Don’t Cry” (#1, 1962) and over three dozen other charting hits, left in 1971 and sold his stake in the group to cover gambling and tax debts, worked odd jobs through the 80s then rejoined the group for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony in 1990 and at the 2005 opening of Tony Award-winning documentary-style musical Jersey Boys chronicling the group’s early days, died from complications of the COVID-19 virus on 9/21/2020, age 92.
1936 ● Shirley Goodman → One half of 50s teen R&B/pop male-female contrasting duet-style Shirley & Lee, “Let The Good Times Roll” (#20, R&B #1, 1956), resurfaced as lead singer for one hit wonder, pre-disco dance-pop Shirley & Company, “Shame Shame Shame” (#12, 1974), died on 7/5/2005, age 69
1939 ● Al Wilson → R&B/smooth soul vocalist, “Show and Tell” (#1, 1973), died of kidney failure on 4/21/2008, age 68
1942 ● Spanky McFarlane / (Elaine McFarlane) → Frontwoman and lead vocals for sunny folk-pop Spanky & Our Gang, “Sunday Will Never Be The Same” (#9, 1967), joined the reformed The Mamas & The Papas in 1982
1944 ● Robin Box → Lead guitar for Brit pre-fab pop White Plains, “My Baby Loves Lovin'” (#13, 1970)
1945 ● Robert Palmer, Jr. / (Robert Franklon Palmer, Jr.) → Musician, journalist, author and rock music critic, played clarinet in 60s jazz-rock The Insect Trust, covered rock music for the New York Times and Rolling Stone magazine in the 70s and 80s, produced blues albums and published books in the 80s and 90s, died from liver disease on 11/20/1997, age 52
1947 ● John Hinch / (John Frederick Hinch) → Birmingham rock drummer in various local bands, recruited in 1973 to the earliest line-up of heavy metal superstars Judas Priest (“Take On The World,” UK #14, 1978) but left after two years due to differences with the band’s direction, pursued a career managing local bands mostly outside of the limelight generated by Judas Priest, died following a short illness on 4/29/2021, age 73.
1948 ● Nick Drake → Dark-themed, multi-instrumentalist Brit folk-rock singer/songwriter, notable album Pink Moon (1972), committed suicide on 11/25/1974, age 26
1950 ● Ann Wilson → With younger sister Nancy, co-frontwoman for hard AOR rock Heart, “These Dreams” (#1, 1986)
1953 ● Larry Dunn / (Larry Dunn (Lawrence Dunhill)) → Keyboards, synthesizer and musical director for R&B/soul-dance-pop Earth, Wind & Fire, “Shining Star” (#1, 1975)
1954 ● Lou Pearlman / (Louis Jay Pearlman) → Record producer, band manager and fraudster known first as the manager of 90s boy bands Backstreet Boys (“Quit Playing Games (With My Heart),” #2, UK #2, 1996) and NSYNC (“Bye Bye Bye,” $1, UK #3, 2000), later achieved infamy as the perpetrator of a $300 million Ponzi scheme, tried and convicted in 2008, sentenced to 25 years in prison, where he died from a heart attack on 8/19/2016, age 62.
1957 ● Maxi Jazz / (Maxwell Fraser) → Rapper in electronic house-pop club quartet Faithless, “Insomnia” (Dance/Club #1, 1997)
1959 ● Marty DeBarge / (Mark DeBarge) → With his sister and three brothers, vocals in R&B/urban contemporary dance-pop sibling quintet Debarge, “All This Love” (#17, 1983)
1960 ● Dennis Fuller → With Edem Ephraim, one half of Brit/Austrian dance-europop London Boys, “London Nights” (UK #2, 1989), died with Ephraim in a car collision on 1/21/1996, age 36
1962 ● Paula Abdul → Former L. A. Laker cheerleader and rock/pop stage and video dance choreographer turned hugely successful dance-pop diva, “Opposites Attract” (#1, 1989) and five other US #1 hits, producer and judge on the TV show American Idol
1963 ● Simon Wright → Drummer for hard rock AC/DC starting in 1983, left in 1989 to join heavy metal Dio
1964 ● Brian Vander Ark → Frontman, guitar and vocals for alt/indie pop-rock The Verve Pipe, “The Freshmen” (#5, 1997)
1970 ● Brian “Head” Welch / (Brian Welch) → Guitarist for Nu metal Korn, “Here To Stay” (Mainstream #4, 2002), solo
1976 ● Scott Avett / (Scott Yancey Avett) → With brother Seth, frontman and guitarist in progressive folk-rock quartet The Avett Brothers (Ain’t No Man,” AAA #1, Alt Rock #28, 2016), also paints and runs an art gallery in North Carolina
1983 ● Macklemore / (Ben Haggerty) → Rapper and songwriter, both as a solo artist and in collaboration with Ryan Lewis as the duo Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, the pair had back-to-back debut singles, “Can’t Hold Us” (#1, 2011) and “Thrift Shop” (#1, 2013), and four Grammy Awards in 2014

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